Katie Lepri

Engagement Producer

Katie Lepri is WLRN's engagement producer. She previously covered city government and corruption, environment and the arts at the Miami Herald. She graduated with a degree in journalism from Florida International University.

She's been with the newsroom since July 2016.

Katie Lepri / WLRN News

Many parts of South Florida appear to have escaped the worst impacts of King Tide flooding this week — at least compared with tidal flooding the previous two Octobers.

King tides in October 2017 came on the heels of record-setting summer rains and Hurricane Irma. In October 2016, a rare “super moon” intensified the highest of the high tides, which can cause water to bubble up through storm drains and into streets, corroding cars and impeding traffic.

Associated Press

Election Day is just four weeks away and the deadline to register to vote is Tuesday, October 9. Early voting kicks off in two weeks. 

WLRN asked for your questions regarding the upcoming Nov. 6 midterm election.

We posed some of them to the top three election supervisors in South Florida — Miami-Dade Elections Supervisor Christina White, Broward Elections Supervisor Brenda Snipes and Palm Beach County Supervisor of Elections Susan Bucher.

Here are some of your questions, answered: 

How do we update our signatures?

Katie Lepri

Updated 9:18 a.m.

Beaches in Palm Beach and Miami-Dade counties are open again after being shut down due to a red tide outbreak, according to county authorities.  

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

A 42-year-old woman's neighborhood was devastated because of Irma’s storm surge. Some of her neighbors never returned. 

A 66-year-old woman in Key West is still waiting for her roof to be replaced.

A 43-year old mom's roof leaks and she wants to move out, but she can't afford to. 

A 59-year-old man's home emerged relatively unscathed amidst severe devastation and loss on Big Pine Key.

These four South Florida residents live with daily reminders of Hurricane Irma. 

Miami Herald

Approximately one out of every four eligible voters in Florida cast a ballot in the state's primary elections last month. 

Voter turnout was up, but not by much. Eighteen percent of voters cast a ballot four years ago, in the 2014 primary midterms, compared to the roughly 25 percent who did in the primaries this year. 

Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald

Within the next 30 years — the same time span for a home mortgage — 64,000 homes in South Florida are expected to experience regular flooding, according to a new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists. 

One out of every six of those homes are in Miami Beach. 

Mark Hedden / markhedden.com

Iguana removal experts say this year be might record-setting in the number of invasive reptiles that are creeping around South Florida.

There's no way to get a firm estimate of the exact number of invasive iguanas in the state. They haven't been counted because state resources have been put in other areas, like the fight to eradicate burmese python out of the Everglades, said Joe Wasilewski, a conservation biologist and president of environmental consulting firm Natural Selections of South Florida. 

Getty Images

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump reversed his controversial policy of separating undocumented children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border, but questions still remain about what the future holds for immigrant children detained in American facilities, including one located in Homestead.

This week, answers about conditions inside that facility were hard to come by. 

Dan Mullan/Getty Images

The first few matches of this year’s FIFA World Cup have been seismic.

Mexico literally shook the ground after beating Germany –a highlight for some fans like Susan Dirgins-Friend, who's from California and lives in Davie.

"Though I am not Latin, Mexico, Mexicans and Mexican Americans are close to my heart," she says.

School's out for the summer.

For thousands of students and their families, the end of the school year means graduation. 

We asked listeners what they would tell graduating students if given the chance to give a commencement speech.


hurricane supplies
C.M. GUERRERO / Miami Herald

It's the the last day of Florida’s week-long sales tax "holiday" on hurricane supplies. So, you may want to hurry up and by that generator, hand crank radio or gas tank--a bit cheaper than usual. 

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

The lull lasted more than a decade. A major storm hadn’t made landfall in South Florida since the 2004-2005 double-hitter of Hurricanes Wilma and Katrina.

That record ended this past September when Hurricane Irma rocked the region and much of the Caribbean.

The Category 5 storm first made landfall in Barbuda with maximum winds of nearly 180 mph. The hurricane then ripped through St. Martin, the British and U.S. Virgin Islands, Turks and Caicos, the Bahamas and Cuba.

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

Fifty years ago, Florida was home to the first statewide teacher strike in the nation. The protest led state leaders to guarantee public employees’ right to collective bargaining in the constitution and state law, making Florida a leader in the South.

Associated Press

Teachers nationwide are protesting their paychecks. Educators in Arizona voted to walk out, joining similar efforts in Oklahoma, West Virginia and Kentucky.

 

Teachers are speaking up at the same time that students around the country are mobilizing against gun violence. Thousands of public school students across the country planned to walk out on Friday in remembrance of the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting that killed 13 people in 1999.

Marco Verch / Flickr

When the clock changes every November, Stan Kaymin has to wear a headlamp to deliver mail in the late afternoon. 

If Florida didn’t change its clocks twice a year, he’d be happier: no more headgear. 

In the most rural parts of his South Dade delivery route, it's just his headlamp and the lights from his truck while he delivers mail. 

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