Luis Hernandez

Host, Sundial/ Afternoon Anchor

Luis Hernandez is an award-winning journalist and host whose career spans three decades in cities across the U.S. He’s the host of WLRN’s newest daily talk show, Sundial (Mon-Thu), and the news anchor every afternoon during All Things Considered.

Luis joined the WLRN newsroom in 2014, and he’s no stranger to life in South Florida. He is a true Florida kid. He grew up in Palm Beach County, spent Hurricane Andrew in a closet in Doral, and has spent almost 40 years as a resident of the Sunshine State.

Before arriving at WLRN, Luis spent four years at KNPR in Las Vegas, as the host of the daily talk program, State of Nevada. While there, he worked to increase the station’s reach within the Hispanic community. He covered the 2012 presidential election from “Sin City,” as well as environmental issues, immigration policy, and the recovery from the 2008 housing disaster.

While working at WUFT, he mentored students from the University of Florida’s celebrated journalism program. He has spent roughly 14 years now in public broadcasting.

Before entering the realm of public radio, Luis worked in news and sports for Clear Channel Communications in Miami, West Palm Beach, and Jacksonville. He also spent two years in television at LeSea Broadcasting in Denver, Colorado.  

When he’s not behind the mic or on the phone with sources, he spends his free time trying to finish his “great American novel.”

Miami Herald

South Florida voters will need to do some homework before heading to the ballot box in the upcoming November general election. Some voters may have more than one page of items and races to vote on. That includes 12 amendment items to be considered for inclusion in the state constitution.

Some of those amendments are actually more than one item that had to be bundled together as to not have too many items on the ballot. A couple of those are being challenged in court.

Brian Vest / Courtesy

One year ago, South Florida awoke to the destruction wrought by Hurricane Irma.

The storm had slammed into the Florida Keys as a Category 4 storm, bringing catastrophic winds and rain. According to the National Hurricane Center, the storm surge and tide produced flooding of 5 to 8 feet in the Lower Keys and winds reached 120-mph in Big Pine Key.

The storm left piles of torn down trees, couches, porta-potties, refrigerators, furniture and other debris across the islands.

Over the past year, South Florida has worked to rebuild. WLRN's Sundial producers traveled to the Keys to talk to Lynda Wells, Douglas Mader and Brian Vest, three Florida Keys residents with one mission: to help improve the lives of people in their community after the hurricane.

You can hear/read their stories below. 


WLRN

On July 13, Walter Edward Stolper, a Nazi sympathizer, was caught in the act of pouring gasoline around his Miami Beach condo unit with the intent of igniting it. He was originally charged with attempted arson, but that was elevated to attempted murder. Miami Beach Police Chief Daniel Oates says the case is likely to be considered a hate crime.

"[Stolper's] got two very powerful prosecution teams, the state and the feds looking at him," Oates said Wednesday on Sundial. "And again we avoided a tragedy because someone heard something and alerted law enforcement." 

Miami Herald

Students in South Florida could soon have an app to help them with their mental health. Teacher Samantha Pratt came up with the idea as a way for students to find help dealing with personal or school stressors. The app, called Klickengage, would also let teachers know the mental states of their students before the school day gets underway.

Ben Sorensen

Fort Lauderdale made national headlines last year when bulldozers cleared out a homeless encampment in Stranahan Park. Before that the city had become part of late night talk show fodder after authorities arrested then 90-year-old Arnold Abbott for feeding the homeless in areas not designated for that activity.

In April, there were more than three billion robocalls made in the United States, according to the New York Times. These automated calls, made to one's cell phone, seek to sell something. Sometimes the recording tells the caller that they owe money to the IRS or another group. 

The #MeToo movement has reached into all sorts of industries. Now, add comedy. There's an all-woman comedy show coming to the Center Stage Performing Arts in Boca Raton this Friday, May 18. The lead organizer, Kim Huapaya, put the event together after one of her colleagues alleges she was sexually assaulted twice. Half of the evening's proceeds will go to the nonprofit Dress For Success.

Miami Herald

Sometimes Leonard Pitts Jr., the nationally syndicated Miami Herald columnist, wants to change your mind. Sometimes he just wants to scream about the things that bother him. He says that may be the case when he's writing about President Trump. Currently, he's in a Twitter spat with Senator Marco Rubio.

Jose Iglesias / Miami Herald

Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie is facing questions about honesty and transparency – so much so that he opened a community forum Monday by stating that he was not a liar.

FERNANDO VERGARA / MIAMI HERALD

The refugee crisis in Venezuela is putting pressure on neighboring countries, especially Colombia. WLRN's Americas Correspondent Tim Padgett was in Cucuta, Colombia to get a closer view of the town where tens of thousands of Venezuelans are arriving once they cross the border.

by Emily Michot / Miami Herald

Sundial's guests for Thursday, April 19, 2018: 

Dozens of students, parents and school staff in Broward County gathered for a discussion about campus safety with  Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie and his top administrators. WLRN's Jessica Bakeman was in attendance.

WLRN

Sundial's guests for Wednesday, April 18:

Cuba's Raul Castro stepped down and the new leader of the communist island is Miguel Diaz-Canel. WLRN's Tim Padgett discusses what the new president means for U.S.-Cuba relations.

https://medium.com/legendary-women/where-islam-meets-hip-hop-a-conversation-with-amirah-sackett-of-were-muslim-don-t-panic-30d63dd150ba

State Rep. Shevrin Jones, a South Broward Democrat,  is running for reelection. He joins us to discuss his stance on gun legislation and how his platform has changed.

Tim Padgett

The Human Rights Watch recently released a dispatch on a growing problem in Venezuela. Tamara Taraciuk Broner published her findings called Kids Behind Bars in Venezuela. She said on Sundial that government officials had arrested more than 400 minors.

The Miami Dade College Museum of Art and Design has a new director in Rina Carvajal and a new mission. We discussed a few of their latest exhibits still to come.

Miami Herald

The Ellies, a program launched today by ArtCenter South Florida, will award grants to local visual artists in Miami-Dade ranging from $2,500 to $25,000. The Ellies, which will give up to $500,000 total, is the brainchild of ArtCenter's new President and CEO Dennis Scholl.

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