Mary Shedden

Mary Shedden is news director at WUSF.

Since arriving at WUSF in 2013, she has worked as a reporter and as editor of the Health News Florida journalism collaborative.

At WUSF and Health News Florida, Mary has been part of winning numerous awards, including a 2016 national Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio and Television Digital News Association. Her work also has been honored by the Florida Associated Press Broadcasters, and state and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

During her nearly 20 years at The Tampa Tribune and TBO.com, Florida Today and the Gainesville Sun, she covered everything from the investigation of a serial killer to retired pro athletes in chronic pain, winning honors from SPJ, the Associated Press Sports Editors, and the Florida Society of News Editors.

A graduate of the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communications, Mary has lived in the Tampa Bay area since 1999.

Contact Mary at 813-974-8636, on twitter @MaryShedden or by email at shedden@wusf.org.

A civil rights attorney best known for representing the family of Trayvon Martin said Thursday that prosecutors should not apply Florida's Stand Your Ground law in a recent shooting death near Clearwater.

Tampa strip club owner and cancer patient Joe Redner can use medical marijuana he grows on his own, a Leon County Circuit judge ruled Wednesday.

The final public hearing of Florida’s Constitution Revision Commission on Tuesday included a new push to let voters decide if Florida should ban assault-style weapons.

It’s been a crazy year in the media, and one in which journalists found their credibility constantly challenged. 

Residents in Florida's biggest cities may be reluctant to recommend their hometown to people looking to move.

The USF-Nielsen Sunshine State Survey asked about deterrents to moving to a community, and 72 percent of people listed traffic congestion as "a problem" or "a big problem."

Just months after seeing the budget for the state tourism marketing agency cut to $75 million amid a cantankerous political fight, Gov. Rick Scott is asking again for a major boost.

Abe Aboraya, a Health News Florida reporter based at WMFE in Orlando, has been selected as one of seven journalists in the country for a year-long investigative reporting project.

O.J. Simpson is set to be released from a Nevada prison next week. And Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi is trying to stop the celebrity-turned convicted robber from moving here.

It’s been nearly a week since Hurricane Harvey reached the Texas coast and news from the devastation continues to consume the news cycle and our social media feeds.

But one thing that’s clear is that the dramatic way the flooding is unfolding -- and how people around Houston are communicating with one another - is completely changing the way we’re seeing and hearing the stories of natural disasters.

After more than four decades as a journalist, Health News Florida’s founder and former editor Carol Gentry is retiring from WUSF Public Media.

Last week, a colorful rant by the short-lived White House Communications Director left media across the country and world scrambling to figure out what to do with some pretty vulgar words.

It’s been a year since 49 people died in a mass shooting at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando.

It happened in a city best known as a wholesome family vacation destination, but one that has also unofficially been host for the past 25 years to Disney’s Gay Days. That event attracts about 150,000 people a year to local attractions, hotels, restaurants and clubs.

These days, the barrage of news coming from Washington DC includes a lot that's being leaked to the media via anonymous sources. President Donald Trump and a number of lawmakers are saying the leaks are not just dangerous - they're illegal.

And now, there's been an arrest.

Facebook’s the primary news gateway for a lot of Americans. And while most people on it know it's a haven for fake news, we may be getting gamed by those sites more than we realize.

No one wants to be arrested. But fact is it happens every day - to people who deserve it - and some who are just good folk caught up in a bad situation.

While people in that latter category may see the charges against them dropped, they’ll still have a memento of their night in jail: a mugshot automatically published on the internet for the entire world to see.

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