Nadege Green

Reporter

 Nadege Green covers social justice issues for WLRN.

For her, journalism boils down to not only telling the stories of the people who are accessible, but also seeking out the voices we don't hear from, and telling those stories too.

Her work was received numerous awards, including a 2017 Regional Edward R. Murrow Award (Planning Funerals For Children Lost To Gun Violence), 2016 first place investigative reporting award from the National Association of Black Journalists and Florida AP Broadcaster awards.

In 2018 Green was recognized by the Miami Foundation with the Ruth Shack Leadership award for her body of work that gives voice to communities that are often not heard.

Green's reporting has appeared in the Miami Herald, NPR and PRI. Her work has also been cited in Teen Vogue, The Root, Refinery 29 and the Washington Post.

She previously worked at the Miami Herald covering city governments and the Haitian community. Green studied English with a specialization in professional writing at Barry University.

Follow her on Twitter @nadegegreen

Nadege Green / WLRN

Edna House is parting her daughter’s hair into small neat triangle ponytails while the three-year old watches cartoons inside their apartment. The pair was abruptly moved into this unit a week ago.

House says she complained for more than a year to the management at the Stonybrook Apartments that her last apartment had a mold problem.

“They knew what was going on and yet they still did nothing,” she says. “I complain and complain and they saw me as like a nuisance.”

COURTESY OF JAMARAH AMANI

When Jamarah Amani sent her daughter to a one-week STEM summer camp at the University of Miami, she expected her 12-year old to come home excited to share all of the cool things she was learning about science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Instead, on the second day of camp, Mahoro Amani told her mom that she was called the n-word and a derogatory term for lesbian by a white camp participant.

“She didn't come home and tell me, ‘This is what I learned in camp today.’ She came home and said,  ‘I was called a n----r to my face.”

Courtesy In Good Company Miami

A new meet-up series called “Locker Room Talk” gives men in Miami a space to gather and discuss different issues that affect them.

Akie Smythe, co-founder of In Good Company Miami, the group that hosts the talks, says he wanted to build a community for men to have honest conversations with each other and network. 

Past conversation topics have ranged from the meaning of consent to marriage and forgiveness. On Thursday (August 9), the meetup will tackle vulnerability.

Smythe says vulnerability is a strength, but it isn't always viewed that way for men. 

For years, the Caribbean Marketplace in Little Haiti, also known as Mache Ayisyen, sat empty and in disrepair. 

Jose Iglesias / Miami Herald

Two undocumented immigrants who were arrested for driving without a license and face deportation are suing Miami-Dade County over its immigration detention policy. The lawsuit was filed in federal court this week, claiming the county’s policy is unconstitutional.

 

Nadege Green

Johny Silionord points to the gaping hole in the floor when he opens the front door to his first-floor apartment in Little Haiti.

“Look at this. This is what I’m paying for,” he says in Creole.

Three white buckets sit alongside a wall in his room. They come in handy to collect the water that pours through the ceiling during a rainstorm or to catch the water that seeps through when his upstairs neighbor flushes the toilet.

ACLU

A new study looks at the disparate treatment of black adult criminal defendants in Miami-Dade County.

“Unequal treatment: Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Miami-Dade Criminal Justice,” finds black Hispanics and black non-Hispanics are overrepresented in local jails and face harsher penalties as they make their way through the court system.

Nadege Green / WLRN

They call themselves “Mothers Fighting For Justice.” But it’s not just moms—siblings, girlfriends and close friends are also here.

Dieu Nalio Chery / Associated Press

What happens in Haiti is felt in South Florida. 

Recent protests in Haiti over hikes in fuels costs caused many in the Haitian diaspora to reflect on the politics and stability of the island. 

Two Miami artists are creating a visual archive of the toll gun violence takes by drawing portraits of people whose lives ended abruptly by bullets.

Chire Regans and Markeven Williams embarked on their individual projects around the same time, but they didn't know each other. Regan, a teaching artist at the Perez Art Museum, and Williams, a corrections officer, both say they were moved by the killing of six-year old King Carter in 2016. King was going to buy candy outside of his North Miami-Dade home when he was shot. 

Siggi Bachmann / New World Symphony

American orchestras are overwhelmingly white. Black and Latino musicians make up less than five percent of orchestra members, according to the Sphinx Organization, which works to increase diversity in the arts.

And the National Alliance for Audition Support—a collaboration between Sphinx, New World Symphony and the League of American Orchestras—wants to change that. 

Miami Herald

Former Palm Beach Gardens Officer Nouman Raja tried to use Florida's "stand your ground" law to have manslaughter and attempted murder charges against him dismissed. Raja shot and killed  Corey Jones, 31, whose car was stranded on the side of the road.

On Friday, Circuit Judge Samantha Schosberg Feuer denied the motion to dismiss.

Pixabay

Florida was the first state to enact a "stand your ground" law. Under the law, a person is allowed to use lethal force — and has no duty to retreat — if they believe they are in danger.

Since it was enacted in 2005, the law has drawn high-profile controversies, including the shooting of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.

Harvard professor Caroline Light was recently in Miami to talk about the law’s historical roots and her book “Stand Your Ground: A History of America's Love Affair with Lethal Self-Defense.”

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