Sam Newlon

Sam Newlon interning as a WUSF/USF Zimmerman School digital news reporter for spring 2018.

Born and raised in San Antonio, Fla., Sam attended the University of Alabama before transferring to the University of South Florida to pursue a career in journalism. He is currently a junior who covers USF athletic programs as a staff writer for The Oracle, USF’s student newspaper.

Sam would like to become a sportswriter for a major sports media network and is interested in filmmaking. 

A USF professor rewrote a tasty part of Italian history after running tests on the inside of a 4,000 year-old jar found in a prehistoric settlement in Castelluccio, Italy.

Florida beachgoers often imagine a day on the water. Colorful umbrellas peppered across the sand, the sound of waves foaming as they crash onto the shore and the inescapable smell of saltwater nipping at your senses.

Sometimes, instead of this picturesque scene, a sickening odor of dead fish wafts across empty beaches, local restaurants are closed because they can’t prepare seafood, and residents even experience trouble breathing. The culprit is red tide.

No more computer models or projections. Finally – concrete data.

A scientific paper published in February may pave the way for a new conversation about rising sea levels using data instead of projections.

Nobody sat in the back row.

Students filled the front rows at the center of the auditorium at Tampa’s King High School during an optional voter registration campaign put on Wednesday by the Hillsborough County Elections Office. They were chattering when they walked in, but the room silenced when county officials started speaking.

They were ready to build on a political movement started by students in South Florida after a deadly school shooting there two weeks ago.