business

California will be the first state to require publicly traded companies to have at least one woman on their board of directors.

The law, signed by Gov. Jerry Brown on Sunday, requires public companies whose principal executive offices are located in California to comply by the end of 2019. The minimum is two female directors if the company has five directors on its board, or three women if it has seven directors by the close of 2021.

Satellite radio giant SiriusXM is buying the Oakland, Calif.-based digital radio company Pandora in an all-stock deal valued at $3.5 billion, the companies announced Monday. The deal is expected to close in early 2019.

The merger would create "the world's largest audio entertainment company," SiriusXM CEO James Meyer said in a conference call. The deal would still need to be reviewed by antitrust regulators and shareholders, he added.

Suzana Blake / NOAA Fisheries

Hurricane Irma cost Florida's fishing industries almost $200 million, according to a damage assessment released by the state and federal governments.

Movie theater subscription service MoviePass will not be raising prices, as it had announced last week, but will instead be capping the number of times that subscribers can visit movie theaters.

For $9.95 per month, MoviePass subscribers used to be able to see a movie in theaters every day, if they so chose. Beginning on August 15, the service will instead provide three movies per month.

The days of plastic straws are drawing shorter.

Marriott International on Wednesday became the latest big company to announce it will stop using plastic straws, saying it would remove them from its more than 6,500 properties by next July. The giant hotel chain said it will stop offering plastic stirrers, too.

Updated at 9:15 a.m. ET

The European Commission has fined Google $5 billion for violating the European Union's antitrust rules — specifically, by forcing manufacturers of Android phones to install the Google search app and the Chrome Web browser.

"Google has used Android as a vehicle to cement the dominance of its search engine," Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said in a statement. "These practices have denied rivals the chance to innovate and compete on the merits."

Have you ever noticed something most virtual assistants have in common? They all started out female.

One of the most famous, Amazon's Alexa, got her name because of CEO Jeff Bezos' preference. "The idea was creating the Star Trek computer. The Star Trek computer was a woman," says Alex Spinelli, who ran the team that created the software for Alexa.

Spinelli is now the chief technology officer of LivePerson. His boss, CEO Robert LoCascio, is bothered by that story about Alexa.

Several months into the Trump administration's aggressive rollout of tariffs on imported products, the results are piling up across the American business landscape. And not all of them are negative.

In Hillsboro, Ore., a solar plant got a second chance at life after tariffs on imported solar panels went into effect in January.

Kathleen Dubos

Bonjour, comment-allez vous?

On a recent Wednesday, two women sit on leather chairs with foil on their heads. Suddenly a brown-haired stylist says with a strong French accent, "Madame Medeiros, it’s time to rinse your colour." 

About 50,000 French expats live in Miami-Dade County, according to the French Consulate in Miami. They open shops and restaurants as a way to bring home and their culture to South Florida.

At least 11 Nike executives have left the company this year over complaints of an uncomfortable workplace that discriminates against women.

The first to go was Nike's president, Trevor Edwards. The announcement came in mid-March that the company's No. 2 is retiring in August after more than 25 years. Edwards had been considered a favorite to succeed CEO Mark Parker.

The next day, it was announced that Jayme Martin, a vice president and general manager of global categories for Nike, was no longer with the company.

Lieutenant Elizabeth Crapo, NOAA Corps / via Wikimedia Commons

South Florida’s future looks wet, salty and, unless you’re a mermaid, maybe a bit apocalyptic.

H. Wayne Huizenga, Billionaire Entrepreneur and South Florida Sports Icon, Dies At 80

Mar 23, 2018
Roy Erickson / Courtesy of Florida Memory

H. Wayne Huizenga’s father once offered his boy the kind of sage advice many parents give their children:

“You can’t make money working for somebody else.”

Huizenga, unlike many, listened. And learned.

Nancy Dahlberg / Miami Herald

Guests for Sundial Wednesday, Feb. 14 2018:

Senior counsel for the Fair Elections Legal Network, Jon Sherman, represented the plaintiffs in the landmark case Hand v. Scott that found Florida’s current process for restoring convicted felons’ voting rights unconstitutional. He spoke with us about the case and what the new path for restoring felons’ voting rights should be.

L.L. Bean's outdoor gear — including its signature Bean Boots prized by campers and hipsters alike — is no longer guaranteed for life.

In a letter to customers Friday morning, the company said it has updated its return policy to give customers one year to return purchases, with a receipt. The previous lifetime guarantee, which enabled customers to return products years — or even decades — after purchase, has long been a selling point for the company.

Alex Gonzalez / WLRN News

It doesn't have a name or colors, but Miami's long-awaited professional soccer team has an anthem.

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