climate change

WINDSOR JOHNSON / NPR

South Florida could see two feet or more of sea level rise in the next forty years, according to a joint projection by Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe counties.

JAYME GERSHEN/EVE MOSHER/FLICKR

Maybe you're wondering how bad the threat is.

Maybe you're curious if you're going to see serious sea-level rise in your lifetime.

Maybe you just want to know: Is climate change a real thing?

WLRN

A state senator and congressional candidate says it’s time for Florida to have a unified strategy for sea-level rise.

To make his point this legislative session, he’s wearing rain boots in the Senate.

Last summer, Zac Peterson was on the adventure of a lifetime.

The 25-year-old teacher was helping archaeologists excavate an 800-year-old log cabin, high above the Arctic Circle on the northern coast of Alaska.

They had pitched tents right on the beach. Over the course of a month, Peterson watched a gigantic pod of beluga whales swim along the beach, came face-to-face with a hungry polar bear invading their campsite and helped dig out the skull of a rare type of polar bear.

But the most memorable thing happened right at the end of the trip.

Kate Stein / WLRN

One of South Florida’s state senators is making a fashion statement as the state legislative session starts Tuesday.

This story is a collaboration with Reveal, the Center for Investigative Reporting, and PRX. You can share your own experience with increased flooding here.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

Miami’s yearlong sizzling temperatures were enough to beat a chilly end to 2017, tying the record for the hottest year on the books.

Odalis Garcia / WLRN News

In an empty lot near the corner of 23rd Street and North Miami Avenue in Wynwood there’s a giant statue of a man carrying a fish on his back. A few feet away there are smaller human-like sculptures arranged in a circle facing a pyramid, a sphere and a cube.

The molds for these sculptures have made the long journey from Mexico hoping that, as they are created, these pieces of art ignite conversations about how to deal with sea level rise. 

Last Friday, Florida International University President Mark B. Rosenberg announced the suspension of Greek life activity for at least one month starting in January.

Kate Stein / WLRN

The new mayors of Miami and Miami Beach received updates Monday on their cities' participation in the 100 Resilient Cities program to address present and future livability challenges in Greater Miami and the Beaches.

A new study is calling attention to Florida’s groundwater as the state braces for sea level rise.

The Florida International University study examined South Florida flooding a mile inland.

Michael Sukop says the researchers found the flooding was caused by groundwater maintained at higher levels to help push back against encroaching sea water.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Waiting to address climate change could cost taxpayers in coastal cities — particularly in highly vulnerable Florida — in a way that not even the most progressive resiliency planners have considered.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Southeast Florida has a new plan to help communities deal with sea level rise.

Most young people are concerned with juggling academic responsibilities, chores and maintaining a respectable social life. But there is always an exception to the norm. Meet Delaney Reynolds, published author, environmentalist and freshman at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. She is the founder of the Sink or Swim project, an initiative determined to raise awareness about sea-level rise and climate change. 

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