Florida Constitution Revision Commission

JMV0586 / FLICKR

The Florida Supreme Court on Tuesday sent to a lower court a lawsuit that seeks to prevent six proposed constitutional amendments from going on the November ballot.

Justices tried to make clear they were not ruling on the underlying issues in the case, saying in an order that the transfer to Leon County circuit court “should not be construed as an adjudication or comment on the merits of the petition.” But the order, along with a decision against holding oral arguments, means that the Supreme Court will not immediately take up the dispute.

A coalition of former state legislators and other elected officials is urging Floridians to vote ‘no’ on proposed Amendments to the state constitution. They are calling for significant reforms to the Revision Commission’s process, and even entertaining the idea of its abolition.

Attorney General Pam Bondi’s office is asking the Florida Supreme Court to reject a legal challenge that seeks to block six proposed constitutional amendments from going on the November ballot.

C.M. GUERRERO / Miami Herald

A Leon County circuit judge Monday knocked a proposed education constitutional amendment off the November ballot, saying the wording failed to inform voters of its impact on the creation of charter schools.

The proposed amendment, placed on the ballot by the Constitution Revision Commission, would impose eight-year term limits on school board members and would require the promotion of “civic literacy” in public schools.

The League of Women Voters of Florida is hoping to persuade a Leon County Circuit judge today to strip a constitutional amendment proposal off the November ballot. The amendment in question is number eight, which combines several issues into one proposal like term limits for local school board, mandating civics be taught. But  the part the league takes issue with the section that deals with approving new charter schools.

JMV0586 / FLICKR

Arguing that Floridians shouldn’t be asked to vote on ballot measures that patch together unrelated issues, a legal challenge filed Tuesday at the state Supreme Court seeks to scuttle six proposed constitutional amendments.

The plaintiffs, including former Supreme Court Justice Harry Lee Anstead, take aim at proposed amendments that the Florida Constitution Revision Commission placed on the November ballot. While individual amendments also face separate lawsuits, the petition filed at the Supreme Court targets six of the eight measures approved this spring by the commission.

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi wants the state Supreme Court to overturn a ruling that a dog-racing amendment on this year's ballot amounts to "outright trickeration."

Broward County Charter Review Commission
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

The ballot in November's election will be historic for a few reasons, mainly because it’s going to be historically long.  

Florida’s Constitution Revision Commission meets once every 20 years. Broward County’s Charter Review Commission, or CRC, meets every 12. Both put out a series of resolutions for voters to decide on.

This year, the two commissions overlap.  That means Broward County residents will see at least 24 questions on the November ballot. 

 

Florida voters will pick a slate of new state leaders, local legislative representatives, city and county officials  and toward the end, if they make it-- a dozen or so requests to change the state constitution.  Yet some of those requests are likely to give voters pause upon a close read: do they want to ban indoor vaping while simultaneously banning offshore drilling?  Many of the amendments are grouped together and observers worry the result will end up confusing voters. 

Florida voters this November will decide on a proposed constitutional amendment that spells out the rights of crime victims.

Florida voters will have a chance to ban vaping in restaurants and other businesses, prohibit oil drilling in state waters, create a list of crime victims' rights and give free state university tuition to the spouses and children of first responders who die on the job.

First Responder, State College Issues Go On Ballot

Apr 17, 2018

Florida voters will decide whether the state Constitution should mandate death benefits be paid when law enforcement officers, correctional officers, firefighters and other first responders are killed while performing their official duties.

In a 30-7 vote on Monday, the Florida Constitution Revision Commission backed the proposal (Proposal 6002), which will appear as Amendment 7 on the Nov. 6 general-election ballot.

CAROLE FEUERMAN STUDIOS

Guests for Sundial Thursday, April 12 2018:

 

The Florida Constitution Revision Commission meets every 20 years to review proposals to the state's constitution. The commission has narrowed down thousands of proposed amendments to 12. 

 

Commission member Tim Cerio is an attorney and Gov. Rick Scott's former general counsel. He joined the program from our sister station WFSU in Tallahassee to talk about the revision process and shed light on what voters can expect to see on the November ballot.

 

 

Author Kwame Alexander

 

Gov. Rick Scott’s long-standing priority to eliminate Florida’s certificate of need program for Florida hospitals came to a halt Monday, after a member of a powerful panel withdrew a proposal that would have overhauled the current hospital-approval system.

Getty images via Miami Herald

Floridians will not vote on adding gun control measures to the state constitution this year because a state board, citing technical rules, rejected the proposals Wednesday.

The 37-member Constitutional Review Commission is an obscure yet powerful body that meets every 20 years to propose changes to the Florida constitution, which are then put on the November ballot. During a marathon meeting in the Capitol, several commissioners from both parties tried to add three different gun-related amendments to a proposal related to land ownership.

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