Florida history

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

An iconic resident of Key West may one day be immortalized with the highest honor the Keys have to offer — an island that bears his name.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Anyone who's spent any time in the Florida Keys knows the local symbol is the conch (pronounced konk) shell. The island chain is the Conch Republic. People who were born there are Conchs. It’s the Key West High School sports mascot.

So why, in front of Key West City Hall, is there a proud giant statue of … a tiger?

Sammy Mack / WLRN

A timeline along the wall of the Historic Lyric Theater's current exhibit, on Miami's black health care history, looks like an EKG. The first beat of it, beginning in 1896, belongs to the city's first black doctor, Dr. Rivers.

"It starts with Dr. Rivers and we still haven't gotten his first name yet," says Dr. Dorothy Jenkins Fields, founder of the Black Archives and chair of the committee that assembled pieces for the show, The Evolution of Black Health Care In Miami-Dade County From 1896-2018, In Parallel With Jackson Memorial Hospital's Evolution.

Florida Memory Collection / State Archives of Florida

Dozens of public school teachers filled the sidewalk outside a Miami-Dade County School Board meeting earlier this month, demanding raises with loud chants and colorful signs.

New River Inn
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Fort Lauderdale’s New River Inn has worn many hats since it was built in 1905. It started as a railroad hotel in 1905, then it became city offices. In 1977 it became the original site of the Museum of Discovery and Science before it became what it is today, a museum for the Fort Lauderdale Historical Society

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

The public library in Key West just threw a farewell party — for a guy who left town more than 150 years ago.

Monroe County Public Library

President Donald Trump's scheduled trip to Key West on Thursday will be the first visit to the Southernmost City by a sitting U.S. president in more than 55 years. The last was when John F. Kennedy stopped by to inspect Key West's defenses — and provide some positive publicity for South Florida — in November 1962, following the Cuban missile crisis.

David Salay / Bender & Associates Architects

Key West city officials say that part of one of Florida's oldest power plants is unsafe and should be demolished. But some on the island are fighting to keep the old buildings standing.

EDITOR'S NOTE: After being contacted by a representative of the Seminole Tribe of Florida, WGCU would like to make clear that the second to last sentence of this story in no way indicates that human remains are being excavated by the Seminole Tribe. 

A 7,000-year-old indigenous burial site was discovered in the Gulf of Mexico near Venice. The finding shows this kind of preservation can exist on the continental shelf, surviving hurricanes and sea level rise.

Yesterday's Florida Keys / The Ketch & Yawl Press

When you’re talking about the protection of birds, in the U.S. and especially in South Florida, there’s one man who had an outsize impact — even if his name is barely remembered now.

That man is Robert Porter Allen.

Allen was the researcher from the National Audubon Society who established Audubon’s Tavernier Science Center in 1939. (It's now Audubon of Florida's Everglades Science Center.)

Bethune Statue Bill Ready For Full Florida House

Feb 15, 2018

A proposal to place a statue of civil-rights leader and educator Mary McLeod Bethune in the U.S. Capitol is ready to be considered by the full Florida House.

State Could End Recognition Of Confederate Holidays

Feb 7, 2018

Florida could remove the birthdays of Confederate General Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis from a list of legal holidays under a bill that has cleared its first committee.

A statue of civil-rights leader Mary McLeod Bethune is halfway to its supporters’ goal of replacing the likeness of a Confederate general as a representative of Florida in the U.S. Capitol.

In the final part of our series on historically black colleges and universities, we take a look at the state’s Southern-most HBCU, Florida Memorial University

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