housing

Nadege Green / WLRN

Edna House is parting her daughter’s hair into small neat triangle ponytails while the three-year old watches cartoons inside their apartment. The pair was abruptly moved into this unit a week ago.

House says she complained for more than a year to the management at the Stonybrook Apartments that her last apartment had a mold problem.

“They knew what was going on and yet they still did nothing,” she says. “I complain and complain and they saw me as like a nuisance.”

As soon as Alex Sharenko saw the zucchini, he knew it would go viral.

At a Berkeley City Council meeting last year, a developer was trying to get permission to tear down a house in West Berkeley and replace it with two, two-story homes. The project had already been green-lit by Berkeley’s Zoning Adjustment Board, one of several public agencies involved in the approval of new housing. Now it had to get a majority of city council votes before a shovel could touch dirt.

Ten years after the housing collapse during the Great Recession, a new and different housing crisis has emerged.

Back then, people were losing their homes as home values crashed and homeowners went underwater. Today, home values have rebounded, but people who want to buy a new home are often priced out of the market. There are too few homes and too many potential buyers.

Nadege Green

Johny Silionord points to the gaping hole in the floor when he opens the front door to his first-floor apartment in Little Haiti.

“Look at this. This is what I’m paying for,” he says in Creole.

Three white buckets sit alongside a wall in his room. They come in handy to collect the water that pours through the ceiling during a rainstorm or to catch the water that seeps through when his upstairs neighbor flushes the toilet.

Daniel Rivero / WLRN

A meeting between residents, federal officials and developers at George Humprey Tower, in Miami’s Brickell neighborhood, ended in a glimmer of hope for some on Monday afternoon.

Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald

A Miami-Dade judge on Thursday cleared the way for the county to dismantle a tent village of homeless sex offenders outside Hialeah, and a lawyer for some of the residents said the ruling leaves them no choice but to live on a roadside or street somewhere else.

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

There's a reason why people are seriously considering having Miami teachers live at school.

Miami area teachers can now only afford 9 percent of area homes, according to new data from Trulia.

Fair housing advocates are suing the Department of Housing and Urban Development to compel it to follow a rule meant to help prevent segregation and comply with the Fair Housing Act. The suit, which also names HUD Secretary Ben Carson, was filed Tuesday morning.

Miami Herald

Four homeless sex offenders living in tents outside Hialeah are suing to block Miami-Dade from dismantling their roadside encampment, arguing the county's own rules aimed at sexual predators have left them few options.

"Inhabitants of the encampment are not there by choice or circumstance," reads the request for an emergency injunction from unnamed plaintiffs. "They were forced into involuntary homelessness by Defendant's deliberate, long-standing policy of severely restricting where individuals formerly convicted of certain sexual offenses may reside in Miami-Dade County."

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson wants Americans living on housing assistance to put more of their income toward rent and he wants to give public housing authorities the ability to impose work requirements on tenants.

Under current law, most tenants who get federal housing assistance pay 30 percent of their adjusted income toward rent, and the government kicks in the rest up to a certain amount.

Amid saguaro cactuses and yucca plants, Lauren Rosin shows off a house that she's renovating in Phoenix's Central Corridor, a pricy neighborhood north of downtown.

"This was actually a courtyard and I blew it out," she says, pointing to what will now be an extra-large open kitchen with custom cabinets, quartz countertops and chandelier-style lighting. She'll also upgrade the swimming pool in the backyard.

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

Imagine a new middle school planned in Brickell that has apartments for teachers on one of its floors. 

That's the latest idea Miami-Dade County Public School is proposing to help it's employees find affordable housing in a market where the the cost of rent is constantly growing.

The school district is considering using its own properties on or near school campuses to build housing for teachers. Also being considered: a 300 unit apartment complex next to Phyllis Wheatley Elementary in Overtown.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

Real estate in Miami-Dade County has ebbed and flowed according to the waters bordering it – the tenet of location, location, location.

 

The tide has since turned, though. The city is looking upward, building condos that tower above the ocean.

But the supply of waterfront property is eroding. This has led some real estate developers to buy condo buildings, tear them down and replace them with something bigger and newer.

Florida Facing Affordable Housing Crisis

Feb 1, 2018

In the wake of natural disasters, stagnant wages and a growing separation of wealth, Florida is suffering from an affordable housing catastrophe and concern is growing statewide.

Miami Has More Renters Than Homeowners, Study Says

Jan 31, 2018
RentCafe.com

The renting population is booming throughout Florida, according to a study by RentCafe.com, a national apartment search website.

 

Miami, with 68 percent, ranks third in the country for the largest proportion of renters versus homeowners. Jersey City and Newark, both in New Jersey, top the list. 

Orlando ranks sixth just below New York and Boston.

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