hurricane season

Pedro Portal pportal@miamiherald.com

Hurricane Michael approached Florida with ferocious speed this week, hitting the Panhandle as a Category 4 hurricane and leaving behind a trail of catastrophic damage. The storm went from a depression to a serious storm in less than a week.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

At least 11 people have died from Hurricane Michael, which slammed into Florida's Panhandle with 155-mph winds on Wednesday. The storm hacked a trail of catastrophic destruction in Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia before finally heading back out over water.

Five deaths were reported in Virginia, in addition to four in Florida, one in Georgia and one in North Carolina.

A public health state of emergency has been declared in Florida after Hurricane Michael. Medical personnel have been deployed at the national level to respond. A team of seven people from the Orange County Health Department has been sent to help with recovery efforts after Hurricane Michael.

Updated at 4:55 a.m. ET

Tropical Storm Michael rampaged through South Carolina, North Carolina and finally southeastern Virginia on Thursday, before heading for the Atlantic Ocean.

Fast, Furious: How Michael Grew Into A 155 MPH Monster

Oct 11, 2018

Moist air, warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, and ideal wind patterns supercharged Hurricane Michael in the hours before it smacked Florida's Panhandle.

Second Lawsuit Seeks More Time For Voter Registration

Oct 11, 2018

Three groups filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday seeking to force the state to give Floridians an extra week to register to vote because of Hurricane Michael.

Food Bank Preps For Hurricane Michael

Oct 11, 2018

Hurricane Michael struck Florida’s panhandle with Category Four strength. The Second Harvest of Central Florida is prepping nearly 6,000 boxes to send in aid impacted areas.

Florida Shifts To Search And Rescue After Michael

Oct 10, 2018
NASA via AP

At least 388,000 utility customers lost power as Hurricane Michael crashed ashore --- with potentially catastrophic winds of 155 mph --- between Panama City and St. Vincent Island, before speeding north into Alabama and Georgia on Wednesday.

Time To 'Hunker Down' As Category 4 Michael Nears

Oct 10, 2018

Gov. Rick Scott said Wednesday morning that time has run out for people in coastal areas who debated whether to evacuate ahead of Hurricane Michael, as the powerful Category 4 storm was poised to cause massive damage in the Panhandle.

“It’s too late to get out,” Scott said during an appearance on the Weather Channel. “If you’re in a coastal community, you’ve got to hunker down. You’ve got to do everything you can to keep your family safe.”

As Hurricane Michael Bears Down, Many Along Gulf Coast Remain In Harm's Way

Oct 10, 2018
Emily Mahoney Herald/Times Tallahassee Bureau

PANACEA -- The muggy air hung heavy over the small Gulf Coast town of Panacea on Tuesday as Hurricane Michael churned toward the Florida Panhandle. Grey clouds glided quickly across the sky over the main street’s shuddered seafood shacks.

Storm surges, combined with the new moon tide, were expected to rise in this area anywhere from nine to 13 feet. By Tuesday afternoon, sheriff’s deputies had already knocked on doors twice. The first time, it was to urge people to leave. The second: taking down the information and next-of-kin of those who remained — of which there are many.

Hurricane Michael has become the season’s second major hurricane. The latest flight from the hurricane hunters have revealed that top winds have increased to 120 mph.

Something Could be Coming from the Caribbean Soon

Oct 4, 2018

A large area of disturbed weather over the western Caribbean Sea is being monitored by the National Hurricane Center for potential tropical development over the next five days. While not currently a significant threat to the United States, there is growing interest in what happens to this potential development when it moves into the Gulf of Mexico early next week.

Have you heard the theory that low air pressure during a hurricane can cause a surge in births?

Supposedly a steep drop in barometric pressure makes it easier for a baby to pop out.

As Hurricane Florence ripped through the Carolinas, we wondered if that was really true.

"It's one of those old wives' tales," said Dr. Hal Lawrence, executive vice president and CEO of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

It's far from over in the Carolinas, and President Trump is on the way.

As the remnants of Hurricane Florence roll north along the Appalachian Trail, the floodwaters deepen and the death toll rises. The destruction will remain for longer than anyone knows.

And for the victims, the first days of desperation are giving way to despair.

That is why the president is fitting in a visit to the stricken region on Wednesday.

Farmers across the southeastern part of North Carolina are just starting to report details about the hit they've taken from Hurricane Florence. The rain is over, but rivers still are rising, and the full picture of damage to farms and the surrounding environment probably won't be known for weeks.

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