immigrants

A Texas nonprofit that works with families separated at the border has turned down a $250,000 contribution from Salesforce, a company under pressure for its work creating software for the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol.

One patient's death changed the course of Dr. Lilia Cervantes' career. The patient, Cervantes says, was a woman from Mexico with kidney failure who repeatedly visited the emergency room for more than three years. In that time, her heart had stopped more than once, and her ribs were fractured from CPR. The woman finally decided to stop treatment because the stress was too much for her and her two young children. Cervantes says she died soon after.

Miami Herald reporter Doug Hanks has been following closely the race to represent District 5 at the Miami-Dade County Commission. This is the first time in 20 years the seat has opened. Hanks talked to Sundial about the candidates, their platforms and the significance of this race.

List of voting place for District 5 on May 22 can be found here.

Hurricane season begins June 1 and director of the National Hurricane Center Ken Graham, who recently spoke at the 32nd Annual Governor’s Hurricane Conference, joins Sundial.

The conference is held before the start of each hurricane season and offers sessions on hurricane preparedness and communication. Sundial spoke to Graham about the conference and the need for awareness around how climate change intensifies storms.

Andrew Harnik / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

Ever since he ran away from immigration reform, Americans no longer look to Florida Sen. Marco Rubio for bridge-building leadership on that issue. But I’m still willing to believe Rubio’s heart is in the right place, even if his head left the building.

So I was also willing to believe the Miami Republican was sincere when he told reporters in Tallahassee this week that he doesn’t “see the problem” with the Trump administration’s proposal to ask folks if they’re U.S. citizens in the 2020 Census.

Miami Herald

Sundial guests for Wednesday, January 31st, 2018

Jessica Bakeman/WLRN Education Reporter gives us an update on the legislative session.

Author/Journalist Laura Wides-Munoz discusses her book "The Making of a Dream."

Felicia Hatcher/ Co-founder of Black Tech Week joins us to talk tech in South Florida.

A few days after Donald Trump was elected President, more than a hundred people packed into a church sanctuary in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. to hear a presentation about refugee resettlement in their town.

It didn't go well.

One of President Trump's boldest, most ambitious proposals on the campaign trail was to build a wall along the Southern border and get Mexico to pay for it. Amid the tumult of Trump's first few months in office, the border wall hasn't gotten as much attention as some other things. But new legislation has been introduced in Congress to help fund it.

It's called the Border Wall Funding Act of 2017, introduced on March 30 by Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Ala.

Jason Cisneroz, a community service officer in Houston, is troubled. His job in the nation's fourth largest city is to forge good relations between the police and Hispanic immigrants, a population typically wary of blue uniforms.

"A couple of days ago there was a witness to a burglary of a motor vehicle," he said. "She saw the suspects run to a certain place and with items they stole from a car, but she was afraid to come to police, she was in fear they would ask for her papers."

A federal appeals court panel in Seattle has ruled that immigrant children under the threat of deportation may not sue the government for legal representation as part of a class action. The ruling is a significant setback for the legal rights of immigrant minors.

Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

COMMENTARY

On immigration, this month’s Republican and Democratic conventions were as different as pit bulls and collies.