Miami

Jennine Capó Crucet / Courtesy

Cuban-American author Jennine Capó Crucet has taken her “very Miami” teaching style and pineapple tights to Nebraska.

Her book, “Make Your Home Among Strangers,” is the first title of the Sundial Book Club. It follows a young Cuban-American woman, Lizet Ramirez, as she goes from her life in Hialeah to an elite private school in the Northeast. Ramirez is then pulled between life at college and home, finding herself in the middle of a national immigration debate in Miami. 

Sam Turken / WLRN

People experiencing homelessness in Miami now have access to a new bathroom after the city  opened on Wednesday its first permanent toilet in Downtown. 

Sam Turken / WLRN

Miami ranks 29th on a list of cities for how well it integrates immigrants, according to a new annual assessment by the bipartisan group New American Economy. 

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COMMENTARY

As a registered independent, I neither supported nor opposed Maria Elvira Salazar’s Republican primary run for Congress from Florida’s 27th District, where I reside.

But there’s one thing about Salazar’s landslide victory on Tuesday that I’m unabashedly enthusiastic about. It may have finally driven a stake through the heart of one of South Florida’s most poisonous political practices: accusing your opponent of being soft on communist Cuba.

Venezuelan Government

Critics joke that Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro blames the U.S. – especially his Venezuelan foes living in the U.S. – whenever he stubs his toe. And most of the world ignores his leftist scapegoating.

But this month the world is wondering, cautiously, if Maduro might have a case, at least when it comes to some Venezuelans residing here.

The Miami Urban Future Initiative

Courtesy of Dimitri Largaespada

Some Nicaraguans in Miami who have been organizing to aid those opposing President Daniel Ortega are now focusing their efforts on the country's neighbor, Costa Rica.

Alejandra Martinez / WLRN

A Florida law now requires students new to a school district to disclose whether they have received mental health services. The controversial new requirement is one of several school safety measures passed after the February Parkland school shooting. 

The required disclosure is already raising privacy concerns. And parents say they're unsure about what qualifies as mental health services. 

Sam Turken / WLRN

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson of Florida toured the Liberty Square public housing complex with local politicians Friday before meeting with more than a dozen Liberty City activists—some of whom have lost relatives to shootings.

The discussion focused on ways to reduce gun violence and improve housing and other opportunities in the area that has long been a hotbed for violence and poverty. 

Alfredo Zuniga / AP

Human rights groups say the number of anti-government protesters killed by security forces in Nicaragua has risen sharply in recent days. That's prompted a key anti-government activist – who had fled to Miami – to go back to Nicaragua.

The city of Miami launched a partnership on Wednesday with a neighborhood watch social network in order to help police investigate crimes and share safety alerts. 

'Neighbors' by the doorbell security company, Ring, is a free app that allows residents of a neighborhood to collect and share with each other videos and photos of suspicious activity. Thousands of people in Miami already use Ring's security system, according to the company's representatives, and the city's police hope Neighbors will help them solve crimes faster. 

White House Correspondent of the PBS Newshour, Yamiche Alcindor is co-moderating the Florida Freedom Forum’s Debate for the Gubernatorial Democratic primary.
Courtesy of Nathaniel Cline / Defining Cultures

Yamiche Alcindor, White House correspondent of the PBS Newshour, grew up in South Florida. She remembers living through hurricane Andrew and debating at Fort Lauderdale and Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Danny Hwang

The law studies class in Brownsville Middle School just got a lot more engaging: students are getting a law academy lab, complete with jury rooms and witness stands.

For the past 3 years, law studies class at Brownsville middle school involved mock trials and field trips to local courtrooms, in an effort to bring students into closer contact with the workings of law.

Daniel Rivero / WLRN News

Javier Vizoso knew that he was going to move to Miami at some point. But the one-two punch of Hurricanes Irma and Maria on the island of Puerto Rico last September accelerated his decision.

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