Miami Beach

Miami Herald

Beginning next year, Miami Beach’s hotel housekeepers will be armed.

Their weapon, panic buttons, will help combat sexual harassment and assault in the workplace, a problem that is being more widely discussed and addressed following the emergence of the #MeToo movement. Beginning Aug. 1, 2019, Miami Beach will be the third tourism town, after Seattle and Chicago, to mandate that hotels provide the devices. The Beach is calling them “safety buttons.”

Miami Beach Police Department

The former Marlborough House condominium building in Miami Beach collapsed Monday morning, injuring one, according to Miami Beach police.

The building no longer had residents. Permits had been pulled for the destruction of the 13-floor building built in 1963 and bought by Brazilian developer Jose Isaac Peres. Peres plans an 89-story tower on the beachfront property at 5775 Collins Ave.

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Several African American models who were at a casting call for Miami Swim Week said a California-based swimsuit line turned them away Thursday.

The reason? Their race, they said on a video posted to Facebook.

But the line, Huntington Beach-based KYA Swim, said it was “disturbed” by the allegations that the show was discriminating against African American models. The designer went on to open and close its Miami Swim Week show with a model of color.

WLRN

On July 13, Walter Edward Stolper, a Nazi sympathizer, was caught in the act of pouring gasoline around his Miami Beach condo unit with the intent of igniting it. He was originally charged with attempted arson, but that was elevated to attempted murder. Miami Beach Police Chief Daniel Oates says the case is likely to be considered a hate crime.

"[Stolper's] got two very powerful prosecution teams, the state and the feds looking at him," Oates said Wednesday on Sundial. "And again we avoided a tragedy because someone heard something and alerted law enforcement." 

Hustle And Flow: How Philip Levine Made The Money That's Financing His Bid For Governor

Jul 11, 2018
Brynn Anderson / AP Photo/ Pool

Philip Levine has told the story so many times that it sounds like a fable.

With $500 in the bank, a young man opened a small office on South Beach, launched a cruise-line media company and created a tourism marketing empire that sold a decade later for a small fortune. The tale is the backbone of a campaign promoting a self-made, blue-collar businessman who as governor would change Tallahassee to make it work for its 21 million "customers."

Screenshot/MakeMusicDay.org

All of Miami will be dropping beats Thursday.

    

The city is marking the longest day of the year – officially the summer solstice – with a lineup of free musical performances. 

Make Music Miami is joining the worldwide celebration Make Music Day, which began in Paris in 1982 as Fête de la Musique. More than 800 cities in 120 countries carry on the spirit of the day – that all musicians can play in public spaces.

Sam Turken / WLRN News

Phillip Gonzalez didn't think he was going to make it in.

He arrived at Manolo's at around 8 a.m. on Saturday—an hour after many others—to watch Argentina's first World Cup match. At first, the Argentinian restaurant on Miami Beach told him it reached capacity and locked him and several others out as the game began. 

But then Manolo's made an exception and let them in. Others weren't so lucky. 

Discoizzy / Wikimedia Commons

Ernesto Rodriguez, spokesperson for Miami Beach Police, says authorities will approach Memorial Day weekend "like a stadium."

Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Miami Beach won't be elevating new roads anytime soon, after fierce opposition from residents who alternatively insisted their neighborhood didn't flood and therefore didn't need higher streets, or who worried higher streets would send floodwater into their homes.

Neighbors in the city's latest stop on its internationally lauded $500 million plan to pump, pipe and elevate itself away from rising seas fought back from what they say is an unnecessary project — one they say will ruin their property values.

J. Wakefield Brewing

The City of Miami Beach has proven vulnerable to sea level rise and increasingly powerful hurricanes. The roads are equally burdened with taking on millions of tourists each year. The City's new Director of Public Works, Roy Coley, is tasked with overseeing these challenges. He joined the program to speak on the measures the City is taking to improve its infrastructure and resiliency.

Danny Hwang / WLRN News

Miami Beach celebrated pride in its 10th annual Gay Pride Festival this past week. Events began last Monday with a rainbow flag-raising ceremony at City Hall.

On Sunday, the event culminated with a parade. Ocean Drive was shut down for the duration of the main parade, which ran from Fifth to 15th streets.

Paul Thomas is on the board of Miami Beach Gay Pride. He said 83 groups would draw a crowd of more than 135,000 people.

“Lots of creativity, lots of fun as everybody marches down Ocean Drive celebrating who they are,” he said.

Miami Herald file

Guests for Sundial on Wednesday, March 28, 2018:

The city of Miami Beach has been accommodating mass amounts of people for decades. However, this year's St. Patrick's Day celebrations coupled with hordes of spring breakers who saturated the streets to the point that eastbound traffic on the MacArthur Causeway was shut down to prevent people from entering the city. 

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

The first of more than 800 March For Our Lives events in Washington, D.C., the U.S. and around the world took place early on Saturday on the island of Pohnpei in the Pacific nation of Micronesia.

Here in South Florida, things kicked off, fittingly, in Parkland - which was the site of the February 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 people and ignited the student-led #NeverAgain movement for stricter gun control and school safety. Marches were also held in Miami Beach, Boca Raton and Key West.

How Spring Break Crowds Closed Causeway To South Beach

Mar 20, 2018
Discoizzy / Wikimedia Commons

Despite the perfect weather last weekend, another kind of perfect storm landed on South Beach.

Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald

Guests on Sundial for Tuesday, March 6:

Gubernatorial candidates from across the state are preparing for the primary elections that are taking place in August. Miami Beach's former mayor, Philip Levine, has tossed his hat in the ring to run to be Florida's next governor.  He spoke about his plans leading up to the primary elections and what he hopes to accomplish should he become Florida's next governor.

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