Miami-Dade County Public Schools

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

Fifty years ago, Florida was home to the first statewide teacher strike in the nation. The protest led state leaders to guarantee public employees’ right to collective bargaining in the constitution and state law, making Florida a leader in the South.

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

It’s a growing problem in South Florida: teachers can’t afford to live in the communities where they work.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Christopher Powell was pretty sheltered growing up in Coral Springs.

“I didn’t wake up worrying, like many others across the country, about losing my life in school to gun violence,” the 17-year-old high school junior said during a town hall meeting on gun control and school safety on Thursday night.

Then he survived the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas.

“After the shooting on Feb. 14, I now have a different sense of security,” Powell said.

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

Imagine a new middle school planned in Brickell that has apartments for teachers on one of its floors. 

That's the latest idea Miami-Dade County Public School is proposing to help it's employees find affordable housing in a market where the the cost of rent is constantly growing.

The school district is considering using its own properties on or near school campuses to build housing for teachers. Also being considered: a 300 unit apartment complex next to Phyllis Wheatley Elementary in Overtown.

Miami Herald Archive

Miami-Dade County’s school system wants an extra $30 million this year from Florida to better prepare classrooms for a mass-shooting era — with bulletproof glass, advanced monitoring of social media and social workers trying to spot troubled students before they erupt in violence.

The requested state money would let Miami-Dade hire more police and mental-health workers, beef up school security with automatically locking doors and upgraded public announcement systems, and purchase software and hire staff to mine social media for potential threats.

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

The leaders of Miami-Dade County Public Schools opted to negotiate with state lawmakers — rather than sue — over a controversial new law that diverts millions in construction funding from traditional public schools to privately-run charter schools.

It looks like their strategic gamble could soon pay off — at least in the short term.

Joe Rimkus Jr. / Miami Herald

The Broward County school district was passed over — again — for an extra $2,000 per student at three of its most struggling elementary schools.

Miami Herald file

Amid worries over stagnant state education funding, the Miami-Dade County School Board is considering a property tax hike to fund teacher raises.

WLRN / Jessica Bakeman

In elementary schools throughout Miami-Dade County, students snack on cranberry hibiscus during class and eat lemongrass-infused rice in the cafeteria.

They help grow the fresh fruits and vegetables themselves in on-campus gardens. 

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Nearly 10,000 students from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands have enrolled in Florida’s public schools since hurricanes Irma and Maria devastated the Caribbean.

Education leaders haven’t yet quantified the financial impact of absorbing them into schools. But it’ll likely take a combination of funding from the state and federal governments to cover the costs.

While visiting a Coconut Grove elementary school late last month, Gov. Rick Scott said the state has reserves that could be used to help.

Charles Trainor, Jr. / Miami Herald

Miami math teacher Dale Adamson filed into his middle school’s auditorium on Friday for what he thought would be a typical assembly. He left with a $25,000 check.

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