nikolas cruz

Associated Press

Alarmed by his repeated visits to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and his infatuation with his sibling’s notoriety as a mass murderer, prosecutors and police moved Tuesday to keep the younger brother of Parkland shooter Nikolas Cruz locked up on trespassing charges and to strip him of his ability to own a gun.

A Broward County judge set a $500,000 bond Tuesday for Zachary Cruz, who was caught skateboarding Monday on the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School grounds where brother Nikolas Cruz killed 17 people in February.

Prosecutors asked for $750,000. The standard bond for trespassing on school grounds is $25 and Cruz, 18, had paid it, his bond attorney said.

“He’s being held because of who he’s related to, not because of what he did,” Cruz’s bond attorney argued before Judge Kim Theresa Mollica.

Associated Press

Nikolas Cruz was back in a Broward County courtroom Wednesday in front of Circuit Court Judge Elizabeth Scherer. 

With his head down, Cruz sat silent throughout his appearance.

He was indicted by a grand jury last week on 17 charges of premeditated first-degree murder and 17 charges of attempted first-degree murder. Cruz's legal team told the judge that he didn't need to hear his charges read aloud because he already understood them. 

Only 15-year-old victim Luke Hoyer's name was read out loud in the courtroom. 

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

As students staged a national walkout Wednesday morning over gun violence, senior federal officials sat down for a grilling from Congress over law enforcement's failure to act on tips about the suspect in last month's school shooting in Parkland, Fla.

Associated Press

The former student charged with killing 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School last month will face the death penalty, prosecutors said Tuesday.

Miami Herald

Confessed-Parkland shooter Nikolas Cruz has been officially indicted by a Florida grand jury, the Broward State Attorney’s office announced in a statement Wednesday.

Miami Herald

A court squabble has erupted over the handling of Nikolas Cruz’s inheritance from his late mother — a fight that could determine whether the school shooter is entitled to be free representation from the public defender or must hire a private lawyer.

The criminal case against the gunman accused in the Florida high school shooting returns to court Tuesday with prosecutors seeking hair samples, fingerprints, DNA and photographs of the suspect.

Gerald Herbert / AP

The shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School has developed into a narrative of missed warning signs.

Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel announced the latest admission last weeks. The school resource officer on duty Scot Peterson did not enter the building where alleged shooter Nikolas Cruz had opened fire.

Susan Stocker / Sun Sentinel via Miami Herald

After last week’s school shooting in Parkland that killed 17 people, a lot of focus has fallen on the home where the confessed shooter was living. WLRN spoke with the father of that family about the young man’s mental health issues – and about issues of gun ownership.

Nikolas Cruz
Sun Sentinel

Shackled and wearing a red jump suit, school shooter Nikolas Cruz made his first live appearance in a Broward County circuit court five days after he walked into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High and fatally shot 17 people in the worst school shooting in Florida history.

Cruz, a slightly built teen, did not say anything and never looked up at the crowd from his seat at the defense table. It was a tense atmosphere — Cruz was surrounded by Broward Sheriff’s deputies as media members and other lawyers watched from the gallery.

Susan Atocker / Sun Sentinel

When James and Kimberly Snead took in Nikolas Cruz late last year, he was a socially awkward teenager lost in the world, depressed by the death of his beloved mother.

But to the Sneads, Cruz appeared to be progressing.

The young man who had been friendly with their son regularly attended adult-education classes, bicycled to his job as a cashier and watched TV shows with the family. Cruz hoped to become an infantry soldier. With the Sneads’ help, the emotionally troubled 19-year-old planned to resume mental-health therapy begun years earlier.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

President Donald Trump addressed the nation Thursday, telling those affected by Wednesday's shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that "we are here for you, whatever we can do to ease your pain."

And he promised to work with state and local authorities to "tackle the difficult issue of mental health."

Trump spoke for more than six minutes about Wednesday's shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. Seventeen people died and Nikolas Cruz, 19, a former student, has been charged with 17 counts of murder.

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