obamacare

Ensuring that people with pre-existing health conditions can get and keep health insurance is the most popular part of the Affordable Care Act. It has also become a flashpoint in this fall's midterm campaigns across the country.

And not only is the ACA protection, which mostly applies to people who buy their own coverage, at risk. It's also possible that pre-existing conditions protections that predate the federal health law could be in play.

Senate Dems Lose Health Care Vote, Hope It's Campaign Fodder

6 hours ago

Days after ending a turbulent Supreme Court confirmation fight, the Senate turned back to health care — with a battle squarely aimed at coloring next month's crucial elections for control of Congress.

Florida insurers selling health insurance under the Affordable Care Act requested the lowest premium hikes since the law's inception, despite numerous obstacles from the Trump administration and major rate increases last year.

States Leverage Federal Funds To Help Insurers Lower Premiums

Aug 15, 2018

When Tracy Deis decided in 2016 to transition from a full-time job to part-time contract work, the loss of her employer’s health insurance was not a major worry because she knew she could get coverage through the marketplace set up by the Affordable Care Act.

Putnam, DeSantis Campaign Against Obamacare

Aug 14, 2018

The two main Republican candidates battling for Florida governor have a simple message when it comes to health care: Just say no to Obamacare.

Obamacare Audit Finds Improper Payments

Aug 14, 2018

The Obama administration improperly paid insurance companies and HMOs nearly $434 million in 2014 when Affordable Care Act policies first became available, according to a new federal inspector general’s report. 

People who don't get insurance through their jobs will now be able to buy short-term policies that may be cheaper than Affordable Care Act coverage. These plans won't have to cover as many medical services and are exempt from covering people with pre-existing conditions.

The departments of Health and Human Services, Labor and Treasury announced new rules Wednesday that make it easier for consumers to replace ACA insurance with these short-term policies.

The Trump administration says it will restore Affordable Care Act payments to insurers that it had recently frozen, leading to concerns about higher premiums next year.

Programs that help people sign up for Affordable Care Act plans in Florida will have their funding cut by 81 percent this year.

For the first time in years, health insurance premiums sold on the Affordable Care Act marketplace in Florida are not expected to rise by double digits.

The Trump administration said Saturday that it is temporarily halting billions of dollars of payments designed to help insurers meet the Affordable Care Act requirement that they provide coverage regardless of whether a person is healthy or sick.

Premiums for health insurance plans sold on the federal marketplace are expected to increase by nearly 16.9 percent in Florida next year due to changes in the Affordable Care Act, according to a new analysis.

Released on Friday by the Center for American Progress, the analysis estimates that a decision by Congress and President Donald Trump to repeal the mandate that people buy health insurance, coupled with proposed changes to the types of policies that can be sold, will increase premiums for Floridians by $1,011.

When Republicans muscled legislation scuttling the Obamacare health care law through the House a year ago Friday, Democrats waved sarcastically and giddily serenaded them with chants of, "Nah nah nah nah, hey hey, goodbye."

After much drama leading to this year’s open enrollment for Affordable Care Act coverage — a shorter time frame, a sharply reduced federal budget for marketing and assistance, and confusion resulting from months of repeal-and-replace debate — the final tally paints a mixed picture.

Republicans on the campaign trail this year will be eager to tout the potential benefits of their tax cut plan.

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