pollution

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Almost a year after Hurricane Irma, cleaning up the Florida Keys is an ongoing project. A local volunteer group is tackling one of the most difficult tasks — removing all the stuff that got washed into the mangrove shorelines along the island chain.

Amy Green / WMFE

As Florida struggles with 'red tide' algae blooms on the west coast and blue-green algae in inland waterways, a federal program to help communities deal with harmful algae outbreaks is set to lose its Congressional authorization at the end of September.

COURTESY OF THE BROWARD COUNTY SEA TURTLE CONSERVATION PROGRAM

Two sea turtles that were rehabilitated from illnesses are scheduled to be released Thursday morning in Juno Beach.

Tiffany is an adult female hawksbill and Seabastian is a juvenile loggerhead. Staff at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center, where the turtles were treated, say they've recovered from infections and anemia.

It's a much-needed piece of good news for some of the oldest creatures on earth. Sea turtles have been around for more than 110 million years, but humans' impact on the environment is making it harder and harder for them to survive.

Islamorada Backs Off From Ban On Plastic Straws

Aug 10, 2018
plastic straws
Fairywren/Flickr Creative Commons

The Village of Islamorada for now will not join a growing list of municipalities, including Miami Beach, that have limited the use and sale of plastic straws.

Corpus Christi Caller-Times via Miami Herald

With nesting season opening this week, Florida's sea turtles may face yet another threat from the plastic pollution choking the world's oceans.

According to a new study from Florida State University researchers, tiny, sesame seed-sized microplastics in sand could be heating up beaches and changing the balance of male and female sea turtles. Researchers sampling sand at loggerhead nesting sites along the Gulf Coast found the beads at every location they tested, with the concentration higher in dunes where turtles nest.

Jack Fishman

Sofas, refrigerators, pipes and lobster traps all wound up littering the Keys reef and backcountry flats after Hurricane Irma blew through in September.

Now the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary wants to deploy volunteer divers to remove the debris.

Rajanish Kakade / AP via Miami Herald

By 2050, the world’s oceans are on track to contain more plastic than fish, by weight.

Marc Averette via Wikimedia Commons

Biscayne Bay is in trouble. Biologists say about 21 square miles of its seagrass have died off in the past decade. 

A Senate committee in Tallahassee unanimously passed a bill that would set standards for how to swiftly notify the public about pollution. It’s an issue residents in the Tampa Bay Area have grown weary of. 


According to two new World Health Organization reports, about 1.7 million children under the age of 5 die each year because of environmental hazards. It's the first such estimate of the child death toll from environmental causes.

THE TIMES/RICHARD POHLE

This week on The Florida Roundup: 

How much or how little the state of Florida is  telling the public about the spread of the Zika virus has come under scrutiny. So why are some saying the Florida Department of Health's daily Zika update may not be providing the complete picture? 

Tim Chapman- Miami Herald Staff

The news that radioactive material has been leaking from Florida Power & Light’s Turkey Point nuclear power plant into Biscayne Bay has many South Floridians worried. Apparently, they're concerned enough that Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez, at a recent county commission meeting, stated: “This is not Flint, Michigan. Our drinking water is completely safe.”

Common Core Town Halls Bring Out 'Obama-Ed' Critics

Oct 18, 2013

In public forums on Common Core this week, the education standards were labeled things like “Obama-Ed” and “Communist Core.” We’ll dissect the biggest misconceptions and look at why the standards are prompting such vitriol.

Sunrise police bring an end to their strategy of luring cocaine dealers to the city and then busting them after a Sun-Sentinel newspaper investigation. But there have been only a few reprimands from city leaders. 

And a poisonous park in Coconut Grove exposes Miami’s neglect of other contaminated parks.

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