resilience

Peter Andrew Bosch / Miami Herald

Miami-Dade commissioners last week approved a budget that many community groups say is a good step for making the county more resilient against climate change and other quality-of-life challenges.

The Miami Climate Alliance is an umbrella organization of more than 50 non-profits and community groups. Members focus on a range of issues including hurricane preparedness, sea-level rise and access to transportation.

Courtesy of Jody Finver

Miami-Dade residents interested in installing solar panels can join a co-op this month that will help them through the process.

The organizers say the benefits of 'going solar' extend beyond reducing the carbon emissions that lead to climate change, global warming and sea-level rise.

"Is your roof creating your electricity?" asked Jody Finver, Miami-Dade coordinator for the Solar United Neighbors co-op. "If you can create it yourself, why would you pay somebody else?"

Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald

President Trump and Florida Gov. Rick Scott have been reluctant to acknowledge the link between climate change and some of Florida's current environmental challenges, like King Tide flooding, stronger hurricanes and rising temperatures.

Kate Stein / WLRN

A center to help people in low-income neighborhoods prepare for and recover from hurricanes launched in north Miami-Dade on Saturday. 

Organizers say the "community emergency operations center" builds off of Hurricane Irma last year, when community groups from across Florida mobilized to collect donations, host cookouts and provide legal support for more than 23,000 people.

Kate Stein / WLRN

When it comes to sea-level rise, planners in South Florida typically use the benchmark of two feet in the next 40 years, but there’s a chance it could be less -- or more -- than that.

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

The group Code for Miami aims to develop data- and technology-based solutions to local quality-of-life challenges. On Saturday, as part of a "National Day of Civic Hacking," they're inviting other local programmers and civic-minded volunteers to help them tackle some of South Florida's pressing issues.

Susan Jacobson, a journalism professor at Florida International University and a longtime Code for Miami participant, says this weekend’s event will include coding projects on transit and ocean pollution as well as sea-level rise.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Former President Bill Clinton was in Miami Tuesday for a meeting on improving disaster response and resiliency in the Caribbean.

The event, organized by the Clinton Global Initiative and hosted by the University of Miami, aimed in part to introduce people working on hurricane recovery projects to potential funders. Those projects are helping Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Antigua & Barbuda and Dominica build back stronger after last year’s devastating hurricane season.

Riane Roldan / WLRN

There's a buzzword among people who work on quality-of-life issues in South Florida: "Resilience."

It’s a concept we often apply to a person, someone who's able to cope with difficult circumstances. But more and more, the word is being used in the context of how communities respond to issues like traffic, hurricanes, affordable housing and rising seas.

Kate Stein / WLRN

South Florida could see two feet or more of sea-level rise over the next 40 years. It’s alarming. 

 

And there’s growing concern that the risk of rising seas could sink South Florida’s economy before the water even gets here.

Kate Stein / WLRN

After Hurricane Irma, some people with low-wage jobs took weeks to recover the costs of supplies and days of missed work. In parts of the Florida Keys, people spent months rebuilding homes and businesses.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

If current sea-level rise trends continue, the ocean that makes many South Florida cities desirable places to live may become an existential threat.

Kate Stein / WLRN

The newspaper headline for August 28, 2019, reads: “Category 5 Hurricane Expected to Hit Homestead, South Miami in Three Days.”

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