smoking

Florida Smokers Puff More Than Counterparts

20 hours ago

Slightly more than 13 percent of Florida adults smoked in 2017, but they go through more tobacco than average smokers nationally, a draft report given Tuesday to Florida health officials shows.

The Florida Supreme Court will hear arguments in June in a case that focuses on the amount of damages an adult child should be able to receive in the smoking-related death of her mother.

The inspiration arrived in a haze at a Paul McCartney concert a few years ago in San Francisco.

"People in front of me started lighting up and then other people started lighting up," says Matthew Springer, a biologist and professor in the division of cardiology at the University of California, San Francisco. "And for a few naive split seconds I was thinking to myself, 'Hey, they can't smoke in AT&T Park! I'm sure that's not allowed.' And then I realized that it was all marijuana."

Advertising campaigns, tobacco taxes and public bans have lowered rates of smoking significantly in the U.S. since the 1960s. And for people who never smoke or manage to quit, there are major health benefits: lower risk of cancer, heart problems and stroke.

But 15 percent of Americans — about 40 million people — continue to smoke.

Who are they? And why are they still smoking?

Kids who vape and use other forms of e-cigarettes are likely to try more harmful tobacco products like regular cigarettes, but e-cigarettes do hold some promise for helping adults quit.

That's according to the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine, which published a comprehensive public health review of more than 800 studies on e-cigarettes on Tuesday.

A judge in Florida ordered R.J. Reynolds to continue paying the state millions of dollars in tobacco settlement money despite selling off major brands.

Justices Agree To Weigh Damages In Smoker's Death

Dec 7, 2017

A divided Florida Supreme Court has decided to take up a case that focuses on the amount of damages an adult child should be able to receive in the smoking-related death of her mother.

If you read a newspaper on Sunday, there's a good chance you came across a full-page ad warning of the dangers of smoking.

The stark messages with black text on an otherwise blank page tell readers that cigarettes kill 1,200 Americans every day. The same messages start to run Monday evening on prime time television.

Tobacco Companies Ordered To Pay $1.5 Million In Broward Man's Death

Nov 26, 2017
HI FLICKR / FLICKR

An appeals court Wednesday ordered cigarette makers Philip Morris USA and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company to pay a full $1.5 million in damages in the death of a longtime smoker.

A Broward County jury in 2015 awarded $1 million in compensatory damages and $500,000 in punitive damages to the estate of Salvatore Marchese. But a circuit judge lowered the amount the companies would have been required to pay in compensatory damages to $450,000 because of “comparative fault” — the concept that Marchese was partly responsible for his death.

Tobacco Companies Ordered to Pay $1.5 Million in Man’s Death

Nov 22, 2017
Denis Defreyne/Flickr

An appeals court Wednesday ordered cigarette makers Philip Morris USA and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company to pay a full $1.5 million in damages in the death of a longtime smoker.

A Broward County jury in 2015 awarded $1 million in compensatory damages and $500,000 in punitive damages to the estate of Salvatore Marchese. But a circuit judge lowered the amount the companies would have been required to pay in compensatory damages to $450,000 because of “comparative fault” — the concept that Marchese was partly responsible for his death.

Orlando Trial Lawyer Challenges Medical Marijuana Smoking Ban

Jul 7, 2017
Brendan Farrington / AP

Saying Floridians knew what they were voting on in November, Orlando trial lawyer John Morgan on Thursday followed through on threats to sue the state over a smoking ban included in a new law carrying out a constitutional amendment that broadly legalized medical marijuana.

Morgan, who largely bankrolled the medical-marijuana ballot initiative, had repeatedly threatened to launch a legal challenge over smoking, which he maintains was permitted in the amendment supported by more than 71 percent of Florida voters last fall.

The U.S. surgeon general said Thursday that e-cigarette use poses a significant and avoidable health risk to young people.

"We already know that e-cigarettes have the potential to cause lasting harm to the health of young users," said Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. "Most contain nicotine, a highly addictive drug that can damage normal development of the brain – a process that continues until about age 25."

Murthy's comments were part of a report released Thursday on rising e-cigarette use by people under 25.

AMA Creates New Policies To Curb Smoking Among Young Adults

Nov 18, 2016

The American Medical Association has adopted new policies to prevent tobacco use in young adults.

Tasty E-Cigs Popular, Scientifically Uncertain

Aug 12, 2015

Juan Uranga smoked menthol cigarettes for 15 years. Five months ago, the Doral resident started vaping.

“Now that I switched to this, I just can’t stop smoking it, he said while shopping at the Vapor Shark smoke shop in South Florida, where he buys his ‘go to’ e-juice – a tobacco-free liquid that serves as a replacement for nicotine. His favorite flavor: custard.

http://ecigarettereviewed.com

More teenagers are trying electronic cigarettes - known as e-cigarettes - according to a study by the University of Florida. Researchers found that teens who use e-cigarettes are more likely to use other tobacco products.

E-cigarettes produce vapor from a liquid that comes in a variety of flavors, like bubble gum and cotton candy. The liquid can be bought with or without nicotine. 

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