white nationalism

Updated at 10:05 p.m. ET

A small group of about 25 white supremacist demonstrators rallied next to the White House on Sunday, one year after the "Unite the Right" demonstration by the same organizer turned deadly in Charlottesville, Va.

The demonstrators have since left D.C. via Metro, and WAMU's Elly Yu reports that counterprotesters have headed home, too.

Updated at 9:01 p.m. ET Wednesday

A federal judge in California has ruled that a confidential messaging app must release the identity of a user who is accused of helping plan violence at a white nationalist rally last year in Charlottesville, Va.

A 21-year-old Ohio man accused of killing a woman last summer by deliberately ramming his car into people protesting a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., now faces federal hate crime charges.

The Justice Department announced Wednesday that a federal grand jury in Charlottesville charged James Alex Fields Jr. with one count of a hate crime act resulting in the death of Heather Heyer.

Dayanna Volitich is a Citrus County teacher who has been removed from the classroom in response to the discovery that she hosts a white nationalist podcast.

White Nationalist Shouted Down At UF Speech

Oct 19, 2017
WUFT News

White-nationalist Richard Spencer brought his “alt-right” movement to the University of Florida Thursday, calling America a “white country,” but his message was drowned out.

Attempting to speak over the derisive shouts and chants from a diverse and hostile crowd at the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, Spencer and others attempted to preach about what they called the failure of diversity and the success of identity politics.

But the perpetual heckling quashed much of the dialogue, angering Spencer, who mocked the university students throughout his remarks.

White Nationalist Speaks On UF Campus, Met By Protest Inside And Outside Hall

Oct 19, 2017
WUFT News

White nationalist Richard Spencer spoke on the University of Florida campus Thursday, met with vocal protest inside and outside the venue.

UF Ready For White Nationalist Speech

Oct 19, 2017

University of Florida students arose Thursday to a campus outwardly expressing messages of love against the backdrop of a heavily armed law enforcement presence and the specter of a divisive mid-afternoon speech by white nationalist Richard Spencer.

Banners hung outside fraternity and sorority houses called for “Love Not Hate #TogetherUF.”

The Lubavitch Chabad Jewish Student Center had been open since Wednesday for a three-day “Good Deed Marathon,” which drew praise from University President Ken Fuchs.

Lexie Miller / WUFT News

Supporters of Richard Spencer, the firebrand white nationalist whose upcoming appearance at the University of Florida sparked a state of emergency, say he's not a racist.

Protesters Demand Change Ahead Of Spencer's UF Visit

Oct 17, 2017

Protesters with the group “No Nazis At UF ” are demanding that university officials change the banned items list for white nationalist Richard Spencer’s event Thursday.

Associated Press

The commissioner of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement said Tuesday authorities are prepared to handle people who commit or encourage violence when a white-nationalist leader speaks Thursday at the University of Florida.

Meanwhile, Gov. Rick Scott got backing from Cabinet members for the state of emergency he declared in Alachua County. Scott's executive order, issued Monday at the request of Alachua County Sheriff Sadie Darnell, included putting the Florida National Guard on standby, in advance of the appearance by alt-right leader Richard Spencer.

Governor Rick Scott is declaring a state of emergency in Alachua County in advance of white nationalist Richard Spencer’s speech on Thursday at the University Florida.


Miami Herald

University of Florida students hoping to empty the auditorium for white nationalist Richard Spencer’s speech and get free beer in the process are out of luck.

University of Florida officials say a group headed by white nationalist Richard Spencer is threatening legal action after the school refused to rent it space on campus for a September event.

It was all, in effect, over before it even began.

In the face of overwhelming popular and political opposition, a far-right activist canceled a press conference hastily scheduled for Saturday afternoon that some feared would provoke violent confrontations in the heart of San Francisco. This came less than 18 hours after organizers also called off two highly publicized right-wing rallies planned for the Bay Area this weekend.

Updated at 11:55 p.m. ET

President Trump launched into a lengthy defense of his comments on the violence in Charlottesville, Va., and again derided the news media at an impassioned campaign rally in Phoenix.

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