white supremacist

For the crime of striking "Unite the Right" organizer Jason Kessler, a Charlottesville, Va., jury says Jeffrey Winder must pay a fine of $1 — far short of the maximum possible penalty. Winder had appealed his original guilty finding, which included a 30-day jail sentence.

A judge had found Winder guilty of misdemeanor assault in February. After Winder appealed, a jury affirmed the guilty verdict this week but decided he should serve no jail time — and pay only a minimal fine.

Updated at 10:05 p.m. ET

A small group of about 25 white supremacist demonstrators rallied next to the White House on Sunday, one year after the "Unite the Right" demonstration by the same organizer turned deadly in Charlottesville, Va.

The demonstrators have since left D.C. via Metro, and WAMU's Elly Yu reports that counterprotesters have headed home, too.

Updated at 9:01 p.m. ET Wednesday

A federal judge in California has ruled that a confidential messaging app must release the identity of a user who is accused of helping plan violence at a white nationalist rally last year in Charlottesville, Va.

A Florida middle school teacher, who claimed the white supremacist podcast she hosted was satire, reportedly has submitted her resignation to the school district.

The University of North Florida is preparing for a potential rally Monday in support of suspended student Ken Parker, who has a history as a white supremacist. A counter-protest is also planned.

Miami Herald

Today in Sundial: Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen announced earlier this year that she would not be running for office again in 2018. That brings to an end almost 40 years of public service. The Republican legislator joins us to discuss why she made the choice to end her political career, as well as chiming in about some of the big issues being debated on Capitol Hill.

Getty Images via Miami Herald

The University of Florida signaled that white nationalist Richard Spencer will be allowed to rent space on campus — but at a new date yet to be determined.

The move, announced Friday, came as the university faced a First Amendment lawsuit over a controversial event originally planned for Sept. 12.

University of Florida officials say a group headed by white nationalist Richard Spencer is threatening legal action after the school refused to rent it space on campus for a September event.

It was all, in effect, over before it even began.

In the face of overwhelming popular and political opposition, a far-right activist canceled a press conference hastily scheduled for Saturday afternoon that some feared would provoke violent confrontations in the heart of San Francisco. This came less than 18 hours after organizers also called off two highly publicized right-wing rallies planned for the Bay Area this weekend.

The friendship of the four young roommates — though cemented in the dark trappings of an obscure neo-Nazi group called Atomwaffen Division — never seemed destined for bloodshed.


Last weekend, when white nationalists descended on Charlottesville to protest, it was clear that almost exclusively white, young males comprised the so-called alt-right movement — there were women, but very few.

So where were the white women who weren't out protesting in the streets?

For the most part, journalist Seyward Darby discovered, they're online.

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

A small number of right-wing "Free Speech Rally" demonstrators disbanded early from Boston Common after they were confronted by thousands of counterprotesters shouting anti-Nazi and anti-KKK slogans.

Deborah Becker, a reporter with member station WBUR in Boston, said that "a few dozen" rally attendees were escorted from Parkman Bandstand by police and placed into police vehicles "for their own safety."

The University of Florida is cancelling a rally scheduled for September led by white nationalist Richard Spencer. But one of Spencer's supporters may be willing to take that up in court.

UF President Kent Fuchs released a statement Wednesday calling Spencer's rhetoric racist and repugnant. In that statement, Fuchs says the university decided to cancel the event due to safety concerns for the students on campus.

But Cameron Padgett, who helped organize the event, is threatening the university with a lawsuit to allow Spencer to speak.

Miami Herald

Florida ranks No. 2  in the list of U.S. states with the most active hate groups. The most recent Hate Map, put out regularly by the Southern Poverty Law Center, shows 63 hate groups operating from Pensacola to Miami. 

Authorities in New York have charged a white supremacist from Baltimore with terrorism over the murder of a black man last week.

Police say 28-year-old James Jackson of Baltimore traveled to New York City specifically to kill black men.

It was a plan he carried out on Monday, stabbing 66-year-old Timothy Caughman to death on a public street corner, police say.

The Associated Press reports that Caughman was remembered "as a gentleman and a good neighbor."