Aaron Sánchez-Guerra

Intern, Summer 2019

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra is a recent graduate of North Carolina State University with a BA in English.

A trilingual journalist, he has been covering news about the Latino population in North Carolina for outlets like NPR’s Latino USA and Latino Rebels, as well as Qué Pasa, a local Hispanic newspaper. His stories reflect a range of voices, from Central Americans seeking asylum to migrant farmworkers recovering from Hurricane Florence. 

Aaron is eager to work in South Florida for its proximity to Latin America, its rich culture as result of migration, and its diverse and fast-paced environment of unique news.

He is a native of the Rio Grande Valley in Texas of Mexican origin, a Southern adoptee, a lover of Brazilian culture and Portuguese, an avid Latin dancer, and a creative writer.

Ways to Connect

Graphic by Aaron Sánchez Guerra

Thousands of college-age students come to Florida every year as part of a federal cultural exchange program that has been accused of fostering abuse and exploitation, including cases of human trafficking, according to a national report released this summer.

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra / WLRN News

When Hurricane Dorian was approaching Florida as a Category 4 storm reminiscent of Hurricane Andrew in 1992, Miamians and South Floridians included some kind of spiritual practices in their hurricane prep plans. 

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra / WLRN

In the weeks before the start of the 2019-2020 academic  year, the department of transportation of Miami-Dade County Public Schools has been testing new features to increase the safety and reliability of their bus fleet. 

Transportation employees demonstrated on Friday morning a pilot GPS tracking program that provides real-time locations, routes, and estimated time of arrival for all county school buses. The data is also shared with county police.

Ariel Cecilio Lemus / Www.Granma.Cu

For 60 years, the U.S. government has sought to punish Cuba's communist regime through a commercial, economic, and financial embargo – known on the island as the bloqueo. But in that same time, a group of U.S. citizens has also traveled every year with aspirations to work alongside Cubans in sugar cane fields and praise their communist institutions. 

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra / WLRN

The City of Miami wants to hear from residents about their concerns over South Florida’s vulnerability to climate change.

The Office of Resilience and Sustainability launched a series of community discussions and workshops in Coconut Grove Monday night, called Climate Ready Miami. The meetings will go through September and then the city will then develop initiatives and strategies to respond to concerns.

Courtesy of Marisol Blanco

For the last 12 years, Marisol Blanco has been fighting against numbers. 

Specifically, she has been hard at work dispelling the notion that dancing Salsa is about counting steps and following a mechanical style. "That's just atrophying the brain of dancers," she says.

 

For this Havanera, who hails from the the culturally rich Guanabacoa neighborhood, it's all about understanding the African history of Cuban music, how it has created its percussion and steps. Then the rest – and the body – just follows. 

Gerard Albert / WLRN

In rural Redland, on the frontier of the Everglades National Park, big white letters that read “ROBERT IS HERE” have welcomed visitors for nearly six decades into a cornucopia of South Miami-Dade’s local and exotic fruits and vegetables. 

However, the fruit stand's identity as a provider of the area’s agricultural products to be consumed surrounded by quiet fields is at risk, said owner Robert Moehling and his family.

 

Sherrilyn Cabrera / WLRN

In a passionate sea of red and blue flags and shirts, hundreds of Puerto Ricans gathered Tuesday evening in front of the Freedom Tower in downtown Miami to demand the resignation or impeachment of Puerto Rican governor Ricardo Rosselló and the appointment of a new gubernatorial cabinet in the island.

The Puerto Rican diaspora rallied fervently against Roselló and other politicians in the island, chanting “Ricky, renuncia! [Ricky, resign!]”  at the rhythm of lively Plena music being played.

 

Mary Altaffer / Associated Press

The Portuguese word saudade [pronounced sau-DAH-jee in Brazilian Portuguese] has no translation in English or any other language. It’s described as a deep, sad longing for that which has been lost indefinitely or for a time – a loved one, a place, a feeling.

Jennifer Kind / Miami Herald

This Fourth of July weekend was one of the few times that Marlins Park has been filled close to capacity in recent memory. Though the park was close to three-fourths of the way full for three days straight, nobody was purchasing the stadium beer, smoking cigarettes outside, or yelling out.

Gerard Albert / WLRN

On the eve of the Independence Day holiday, 26 South Floridians became U.S. citizens in Everglades National Park.

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is celebrating the birth of the country by welcoming nearly 7,500 new citizens over 100 naturalization ceremonies across the nation from July 1 to 5.

José Viñas, 19, of the Dominican Republic was all smiles after completing his naturalization -- and even danced a little.

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra / WLRN

After decades of squalid living conditions, one of the nation’s oldest public housing complexes is receiving an overdue transformation.

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra / WLRN

 

 

After over a year of vocal protests and intense debates, the commercial and residential development known as the Magic City Innovation District received final approval to be built in Little Haiti. 

 

The Miami city commission voted 3-0 after 1 a.m. Friday to approve it after hours of heated discussion and public testimony from both sides of the matter. Two commissioners, Ken Russell and Joe Carollo, were not present for the vote.

 

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra / WLRN

Tuesday morning's Miami kickoff for the Latinos for Trump Coalition was just like most other rallies supporting the president's reelection — except much of the messaging was done in Spanish.

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra / WLRN

The 2.2 million eligible Hispanic voters in Florida are a key for President Donald Trump to stay in the White House. These numbers are bound to rise after increasing by 6.2 percent since the 2016 election.

 

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