Avie Schneider

Updated at 11:34 a.m. ET

The Trump administration will delay tariffs on cars and auto parts imports for six months while it negotiates trade deals with Japan and the European Union, the White House announced Friday.

Updated at 4:17 p.m. ET

The Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged 473 points on Tuesday after Trump administration officials accused Beijing of reneging on commitments it had already made in trade talks. The blue chip index, which earlier was down more than 600 points, closed the day down 1.8%.

Other indexes also fell, with the S&P 500 down about 1.7% and the Nasdaq composite down nearly 2%.

Updated at 1:24 p.m. ET

Stephen Moore, a Trump campaign adviser and conservative pundit, has withdrawn his name from consideration to serve on the Federal Reserve Board, President Trump said Thursday.

"Steve Moore, a great pro-growth economist and a truly fine person, has decided to withdraw from the Fed process," Trump said in a tweet.

Updated at 4:28 p.m. ET

Uncertainty.

That's what Boeing says is in store for the company and its investors as it tries to get approval for its 737 Max to return to the air.

Boeing said Wednesday its profits fell 13% in the first quarter and that the grounding of its 737 Max aircraft following two deadly crashes will cost the company at least $1 billion.

With its folding 7.3-inch screen, Samsung's Galaxy Fold was touted as the biggest Galaxy phone yet. Priced at nearly $2,000, the folding smartphone was due to go on sale this Friday. But Samsung announced on Monday that it's delaying the release after reviewers found problems with the phone's screen.

Apple announced on Monday a new video-streaming service, Apple TV+, to compete with Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime and others. It also unveiled a new credit card, tied to Apple Pay, and Apple News+, a subscription news service.

The iPhone has traditionally been Apple's biggest moneymaker, but those sales have been slowing, so the company is looking to make services a bigger part of its business.

Updated at 5:17 p.m. ET

The Boeing 737 Max is the fastest-selling plane in the company's history. And now it's under immense global scrutiny after the plane has been involved in two deadly crashes soon after takeoff in less than five months.

Updated at 10:35 a.m. ET

The U.S. economy added only 20,000 jobs — far fewer than expected — last month, the Labor Department said Friday. But the unemployment rate fell to 3.8 percent from January's 4 percent, and earnings growth picked up.

The increase in jobs was below the 180,000 projected by private analysts and the smallest gain since September 2017. February's increase was dramatically smaller than January's revised gain of 311,000 and December's revised 227,000.

Updated at 1:05 p.m. ET

Amazon, the giant online retailer, is closing all 87 of its U.S. pop-up kiosks, which let customers try and buy gadgets such as smart speakers and tablets in malls, Kohl's department stores and Whole Foods groceries.

Updated at 6:02 p.m. ET

Gap Inc. plans to separate into two publicly traded companies, spinning off Old Navy into a separate firm as it closes about 230 Gap stores over the next two years.

As Old Navy becomes its own company, the other company, which has not been named yet, will consist of the Gap brand, Athleta, Banana Republic, Intermix and Hill City, Gap Inc. said.

Microsoft workers are calling on the giant tech company to cancel its nearly $480 million U.S. Army contract, saying the deal has "crossed the line" into weapons development by Microsoft for the first time. They say the use of the company's HoloLens augmented reality technology under the contract "is designed to help people kill."

Updated at 2:28 p.m. ET

The Kraft and Oscar Mayer brands are worth a lot less — as much as $15.4 billion less than they had been.

Big name brands have been under pressure to cut costs as consumer tastes have been changing. Many are turning to cheaper store brands or are doing their shopping online.

Members of the Hartford Courant newsroom are moving to form a union, NPR has learned. It's the latest Tribune Publishing newspaper where journalists have been pushing to organize.

Updated at 9:27 a.m. ET

Job growth picked up for the 100th consecutive month in January even as hundreds of thousands of federal workers were furloughed during the partial government shutdown, the Labor Department said Friday.

Employers added 304,000 jobs last month — topping analysts' expectations and the 223,000 average monthly gain in 2018. The string of job growth underscores the long economic expansion since the Great Recession.

In the latest revelation to raise privacy concerns about Silicon Valley's tech titans, reports have surfaced that Facebook and Google offered adults and teens gift cards for installing apps that would let the companies collect data on their smartphones.

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