Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

Updated July 12 at 11:35 a.m. ET

R. Kelly is no stranger to unsettling allegations.

The R&B superstar born Robert Kelly ushered in 2019 dogged by a slew of damaging headlines — prompted by TV's Surviving R. Kelly. But the roots of the broad case laid out in the six-part Lifetime docuseries, filled as it is with claims of abuse and statutory rape, date back about a quarter century at least.

Updated at 8:15 a.m. ET Thursday

Jill Rorem, like many Americans, had made some special plans for the holidays. The Chicago native, whose legal work often brings her to Washington, D.C., was finally going to get to see the nation's capital with her arts-obsessed kids.

Black directors had a "banner year" in 2018, according to the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative. The organization, which tracks diversity in Hollywood, says there were 16 black directors with films among last year's 100 top-grossing scripted movies — a big leap from 2017, when there were only six.

The tally in 2018 is by far the most the Annenberg Inclusion Initiative has recorded in a single year, and it doubles the number found in 2007, the group's first year of data.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Updated at 8:55 p.m. ET

Police in Sussex, England, say they have made two arrests in the disruption of flights because of drone sightings at busy Gatwick, the U.K.'s second-largest airport.

Flights had already resumed on Friday, after suspensions starting Wednesday night and a complete shutdown on Thursday night, leaving weary travelers longing for their holiday destinations.

President Trump's plan to withdraw all U.S. military forces from Syria has triggered disparate responses — from worries in liberated Raqqa and Kurdish-controlled areas to approval from Syrian and Russian officials.

Trump declared victory over ISIS, saying in a video Wednesday night, "We've beaten them and we've beaten them badly. We've taken back the land and now it's time for our troops to come back home."

Three days before voters were finally to cast their ballots for president, authorities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo declared something that's become familiar: another delay. The electoral commission announced Thursday that elections to replace President Joseph Kabila already two years behind schedule, have been postponed to Dec. 30.

South Africa is not done with Grace Mugabe yet.

In another twist to a saga fit for a small-screen soap — but writ large on the international stage — the country's authorities have issued an arrest warrant for the former first lady of Zimbabwe. They want her in custody for allegedly assaulting a young woman in a Johannesburg hotel room last year.

A third Canadian citizen has been detained in China, according to Global Affairs Canada, the country's foreign ministry. A ministry spokesperson declined to identify the citizen, citing provisions of Canada's Privacy Act.

"Consular officials are providing assistance to the family," the spokesperson added in a statement to NPR. It remains unclear what led to the detainment.

China's Foreign Affairs Ministry reportedly has said that it was not aware of a third Canadian detained in China.

More than seven weeks after the Sri Lankan president fired his prime minister, setting off a political maelstrom with the shocking decision, the saga appears to have reached a peaceful conclusion — by coming full circle.

U.S. officials are meeting with representatives of the Afghan Taliban for talks in the United Arab Emirates, the Islamist militant group announced Monday. The meeting, which was expected to include delegates from Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and the UAE, would mark a new step forward in tenuous peace negotiations.

The Taliban added, however, that it had no intention of meeting with members of the internationally recognized Afghan government.

Virgin Galactic says it has reached a rather lofty milestone.

During a test flight Thursday morning in Mojave, Calif., a pair of pilots flying the company's SpaceShipTwo spacecraft hit an altitude of 51.4 miles. That height clears the 50-mile threshold that is sometimes considered the boundary of space.

Just 10 days from a momentous presidential election in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a warehouse fire in the capital has severely complicated the country's preparations. The blaze, which broke out around 2 a.m. local time Thursday, destroyed the voting equipment for 19 of Kinshasa's 24 polling stations.

Before the sun rose Wednesday over Tennessee, some residents in the eastern half of the state got a wake-up call. But it wasn't a friend or partner shaking them awake, it was the very ground beneath their beds.

A magnitude 4.4 earthquake struck at around 4:14 a.m. ET near Decatur, Tenn., about 150 miles southeast of Nashville. But Tennessee residents weren't the only ones to feel the temblor. More than 7,700 people (so far) have reported experiencing it, from Kentucky and northern Alabama to the western Carolinas. The earthquake even made its presence felt in Atlanta.

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