Jenny Staletovich

Environment Reporter

Jenny Staletovich has been a journalist working in Florida for nearly 20 years.

She’s reported on some of the region’s major environment stories, including the 2018 devastating red tide and blue-green algae blooms, impacts from climate change and Everglades restoration, the nation’s largest water restoration project. She’s also written about disappearing rare forests, invasive pythons, diseased coral and a host of other critical issues around the state.

She covered the environment, climate change and hurricanes for the Miami Herald for five years and previously freelanced for the paper. She worked at the Palm Beach Post from 1989 to 2000, covering crime, government and general assignment stories.

She has won several state and national awards including the Scripps Howard National Journalism Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment, the Green Eyeshades and the Sunshine State Awards.

Staletovich graduated from Smith College and lives in Miami, with her husband and their three children.

Ways to Connect

Matias J. Ocner Miami Herald

Hurricane forecasting has come a long way since Ken Graham worked the night shift on the Gulf Coast, when warnings about killer storms like Hurricane Andrew came only three days in advance.

Miami Herald/Pedro Portal

New federal limits for dangerous toxins linked to blue green algae in water where people swim, boat and fish could help Florida fight the dangerous blooms.

The recommended criteria is the first ever set by the Environmental Protection Agency for two common toxins found in algae caused by cyanobacteria and would need to be adopted by Florida. But environmentalists say there's a problem: the limits are double what was originally proposed in 2016.

Gerald Herbert Associated Press

Hurricane forecasters on Thursday called for a near normal Atlantic season this year following three brutal years that produced hurricanes Maria, Irma, Harvey, Florence and Michael.

Charles Trainor JR. / Miami Herald

Florida's ongoing water woes tops the list of problems to be tackled by the state's new chief science officer.

Al Diaz/Miami Herald

As Michael churned toward the coast last October, forecasters feared the compact hurricane would blossom into a fierce storm far worse than their projections.

But what they weren't able to predict were Michael's three rapid explosions of power that ultimately made it the first Cat 5 hurricane to make landfall since 1992's lethal Hurricane Andrew and one of only four to ever hit the U.S. While track forecasts have vastly improved, predicting intensity remains a challenge.

Jenny Staletovich / WLRN News

Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a controversial measure requiring school districts to share a cut of local money with charter schools on Wednesday.

The bill, which largely addresses tax relief following hurricanes and tax cuts for business leases, drew opposition from school districts that object to sharing tax dollars with charters run by for-profit companies. The change in law means that districts will have to share money collected through special voter referendums.

Miami Herald archives

As South Florida's ritzy coastline, bejeweled with luxury condos and posh hotels, has come under increasing threats from flooding and storm surge driven by climate change, scientists have focused on reefs to defend that wealth.

Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald

After a messy first year at their new location on Virginia Key, Ultra organizers are pulling out of the venue bordering sensitive wildlife areas and the University of Miami's Rosenstiel campus.

The Miami Herald reported organizers sent a letter to the city Wednesday saying they wanted out.

The decision comes a day before city commissioners were scheduled to vote on whether to allow the thunderous three-day music festival to return next year.

University of Florida

The sudden death last week of Florida water expert Karl Havens leaves a void in fighting the state's ongoing water problems, his colleagues said.

"It's such a tragedy," said Jack Payne, senior vice president at the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agriculture Resources and Havens boss. "It leaves a huge hole in who we are and what we do."

Miami Herald/Pedro Portal

In the war over water management, U.S. Rep. Brian Mast is tired of being the loser.

In a letter to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers this week, Mast, a Republican whose district stretches from Palm Beach to Fort Pierce, called current lake management a "total disaster." Water managers , he said, too often place greater importance on supplying water to the agricultural industry without considering the damage to Florida's coast when high water needs to be flushed from the lake to protect its aging dike.


Burmese pythons, the voracious invader of the Everglades blamed for wiping out small mammals, may now be feasting another marsh resident: wading birds.

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