Jenny Staletovich

Environment Reporter

Jenny Staletovich has been a journalist working in Florida for nearly 20 years.

She’s reported on some of the region’s major environment stories, including the 2018 devastating red tide and blue-green algae blooms, impacts from climate change and Everglades restoration, the nation’s largest water restoration project. She’s also written about disappearing rare forests, invasive pythons, diseased coral and a host of other critical issues around the state.

She covered the environment, climate change and hurricanes for the Miami Herald for five years and previously freelanced for the paper. She worked at the Palm Beach Post from 1989 to 2000, covering crime, government and general assignment stories.

She has won several state and national awards including the Scripps Howard National Journalism Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment, the Green Eyeshades and the Sunshine State Awards.

Staletovich graduated from Smith College and lives in Miami, with her husband and their three children.

Ways to Connect

Carl Juste/Miami Herald

Two years ago when Jennifer Cheek and her husband bought their tidy stucco house near the Little River with a rambling backyard - grand even by Miami standards - they thought they’d left behind the threat of devastating sea rise they faced in their Miami Beach neighborhood.

Gabriela Camacho WLRN

Miami youths frustrated with the pace of efforts to address climate change have a message for adults: We're starting a revolution.

At a rally outside Miami Beach City Hall on Friday — one of dozens around the state and hundreds across the nation — protesters waved signs, chanted and expressed outrage at the lack of action. The rally was organized by local students and adults and part of the strikewithus.org effort sponsored by about 300 organizations.

WLRN Lily Oppenheimer

Students across South Florida and the state will be skipping school Friday to join a nationwide youth climate strike

WLRN archives

Miami-Dade County’s morgue sits on a gritty corner opposite the Ryder Trauma Center, in the shadow of a boxy parking garage.

It’s not an unsurprising setting for cataloguing the worst of South Florida. What’s unexpected is inside: a skylight bathes the lobby in sunshine and makes the green carpet look like a forest floor. Loveseats and chairs are arranged for hushed conversations and hugs. A painting of a heron perched in a cypress swamp hangs on a wall outside the records room.

Al Diaz Miami Herald

A doctored hurricane map President Donald Trump presented inside the Oval Office to bolster his claim about storm threats to Alabama — less than a day after Dorian flattened the Northern Bahamas and left at least 50 dead — continues to send ripples through the weather community this week.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

News of soil contamination at a Miami golf course being eyed by David Beckham as a future soccer stadium is not "shockingly new," the county's chief environmental regulator said Wednesday.

Miami Waterkeeper

A crack in a half-century old iron sewer pipe has grown and could keep leaking for up to three weeks while workers struggle to fix it, Miami-Dade County Water and Sewer Director Kevin Lynskey said Friday.

Miami-Dade County

Over the weekend, a crack surfaced in a 55-year-old underground sewer pipe in Miami's Oleta River.

The small crack is less than two square inches in diameter and has so far spewed about a half million gallons of raw sewage. But the flow will continue as workers race to install a bypass pipe on the aging line - work they expect to complete by Thursday night.

While less severe than originally suspected when a kayacker discovered the leak Sunday, the spill is drawing attention to a worsening problem across Miami-Dade County: polluted waterways.

Courtesy of Valerie Preziosi

Four thousand years ago, rising seas decimated huge swaths of mangroves in Florida Bay.

Today, seas rising at a far greater rate, combined with increasing storms and drought, could lead to another catastrophic loss of mangroves that help keep the state from sliding into the sea, according to a new study published by the U.S. Geological Survey in the journal Nature Communications.

WRLN

Two years after Volkswagen agreed to settle an emissions cheating scandal that paid millions to states where the dirty vehicles were sold, Florida is ready to decide how to spend its $166 million.

Carl Juste/Miami Herald

Randall Dasher is a fourth-generation Florida farmer and until last year, he never had a crop of iron-clay cowpeas fail.

"Something has changed and somewhere, someway, that has affected our yields," he said Monday during a panel at the University of Florida, where farmers met with U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor of Tampa, scientists and agriculture officials.

Miami Herald archives

As the planet heats up, polar ice melts, seas rise and Biblical-size rains become more frequent, hurricanes are expected to get wetter and more intense.

But less certain is how much climate change is making these fierce storms, which target Florida more than any other U.S. state, more punishing now.

Emily Michot Miami Herald

More than a week's worth of King Tides set a new record at Virginia Key, running higher than the high tides during seasonal tides that typically hit in the fall.

For the last eight days, each high tide has set a new record for the day, said Brian McNoldy, a University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science senior researcher. At it's highest, on Aug. 2, the tide reached 2.55 feet, more than a foot above the daily average of 1.33 feet. 

Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

The sparkling waters of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary help pump $4.4 billion into the state's economy while supporting 43,000 jobs, according to a report published Tuesday.

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