Jenny Staletovich

Environment Reporter

Jenny Staletovich has been a journalist working in Florida for nearly 20 years.

She’s reported on some of the region’s major environment stories, including the 2018 devastating red tide and blue-green algae blooms, impacts from climate change and Everglades restoration, the nation’s largest water restoration project. She’s also written about disappearing rare forests, invasive pythons, diseased coral and a host of other critical issues around the state.

She covered the environment, climate change and hurricanes for the Miami Herald for five years and previously freelanced for the paper. She worked at the Palm Beach Post from 1989 to 2000, covering crime, government and general assignment stories.

She has won several state and national awards including the Scripps Howard National Journalism Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment, the Green Eyeshades and the Sunshine State Awards.

Staletovich graduated from Smith College and lives in Miami, with her husband and their three children.

Ways to Connect

Katie Lepri / WLRN

Florida joined the ranks of states battling the COVID-19 coronavirus on Sunday after Gov. Ron DeSantis announced two cases on the state’s west coast and directed his surgeon general to declare a public health emergency.

Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

Port Everglades and local elected officials marked the first step in a $437 million expansion to make way for expected massive new cargo ships with a celebratory press conference on Tuesday.

“It’s a critical milestone in getting there,” acting port director Glenn Wiltshire said afterwards of the $29 million Congress approved this month to move a Coast Guard station blocking work.

AP

Among scientists, conveying uncertainty in predictions over sea rise, increasing temperatures and other impacts linked to climate change — without suggesting doubt — remains a nagging challenge.

Andrew Bruckner / NOAA

Scientists investigating a devastating new coral disease infecting reefs from Florida to and throughout the Caribbean may be zeroing in on a culprit behind the unpredictable spread: ballast water from big ships.

Investigators are now poring over shipping records housed at the Smithsonian to confirm the connection and better contain it.

Miami Herald archives

When Hurricane Irma made landfall in the Florida Keys in 2017, it sent a four- to six-foot storm surge to Biscayne Bay more than 100 miles away, flooding busy Brickell Avenue.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers now has a tentative plan to fix that: massive flood gates and walls that could include a two-mile stretch in the heart of downtown Miami.


Emily Michot / Miami Herald

A scarcity of freshwater near Turkey Point has led to another legal clash between Miami-Dade County environmental regulators and Florida Power & Light.

Miami Herald archives

A fight to expand future development onto farmland around the funky Redland region ended Thursday when Miami-Dade County commissioners agreed to exclude some of the last, and largest, swaths of open land from its master growth plan.

“We’ve heard from military. We’ve heard from farmers. We’ve heard from developers,” said Commissioner Danielle Levine Cava. “Balancing all those interests obviously is extremely difficult [but] these environmental protections... have to be seriously considered.”

AP

The city of Miami officially rolled out its plan to fight sea rise and tackle threats from climate change at a rooftop ceremony overlooking Biscayne Bay Thursday.

The plan follows a yearlong effort focused on five critical areas that included flooding, increasing heat and the goal of cutting carbon emissions. That effort led to 86 specific actions, said Resiliency Chief Jane Gilbert — from increasing insurance discounts for flood-weary residents to overhauling the city’s aging stormwater system.

AP

Florida remains the shark attack capital of the world, even if the capital is getting a little less crowded.

AP

Everglades National Park will delay a planned hike in entrance fees while the park continues whittling away at a massive backlog of maintenance repairs.

Jenny Staletovich / WLRN

To end its losing battle to block oil exploration in Everglades wetlands, Florida plans to purchase 20,000 acres in Broward County.

Matias J. Ocner / Miami Herald

On a stretch of the Lower Keys, near an old borrow pit quarried during the construction of Big Pine, sea water and mud cover much of the rocky ground.

Miami Herald archives

Florida’s woeful water conditions may be driving manatees into new, more hazardous territory.

In 2019, the number of manatees killed by boats reached a new high. Of the 574 deaths recorded as of Dec. 20, 130 were caused by collisions with boats, marking the third year in a row that fatal boat strikes increased.

AP

Just after he entered the White House, President Donald Trump pulled out of the Paris Climate accord. It was only the most obvious rebuke of efforts to address climate change, that has since included ending a NASA carbon monitoring program and loosening regulations on air pollution.

WLRN archives

Miami can claim yet another climate title: hottest year on record in a three-way tie with 2015 and 2017.

Steamy high temps for the year averaged 79.1 degrees, according to Brian McNoldy, a Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researcher who tracks climate-related conditions at the University of Miami’s Virginia Key campus.

"All three years are now tied for first place," McNoldy said. "We ended up about two degrees Fahrenheit above the average, which is a big offset."

Pages