Jessica Meszaros

Jessica Meszaros is a reporter and host of All Things Considered for WGCU News.

She was a multimedia reporter for Miami’s public radio station, WLRN Radio, for more than two years.

In the summer of 2013, Jessica interned for NPR's All Things Considered  in Washington D.C. She has a background in newspaper reporting from her summer 2014 internship with the Sun-Sentinel in South Florida.  

Jessica graduated from Florida International University with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from the Honors College.

 

A couple researchers created fake mangroves in Manasota Key to bring back marine life that was lost from development. Along Florida’s coasts are seawalls-- built to prevent the shoreline from eroding. But that defense sometimes means removing natural habitats. Experts are now trying to turn these solid barriers into thriving ecosystems.

South Florida Water managers heard presentations recently on their options for underground water storage. These are possible solutions to excess fresh water that sometimes fills Lake Okeechobee, leading to harmful discharges in the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie Rivers. Experts say one choice is more ideal than another.

Cities in South Florida are torn about a recent ruling that allows water managers to back-pump water into Lake Okeechobee without federal permits. The U.S. Court of Appeals in New York made the decision Wednesday, Jan. 18.

Harvard University wants to study impacts of sea level rise in Southwest Florida-- Collier County, in particular. This was proposed during a climate change meeting at Florida Gulf Coast University on Monday. 

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

There’s a neighborhood in Southwest Florida that’s changing the way people think about affordable housing. 

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

People in Southwest Florida are having a new and sometimes uncomfortable kind of conversation at the dinner table… about death.

 

Medical professionals say most people are not preparing for their deaths. And this usually leaves families scrambling to make choices for their loved ones. So to fix that, there’s this worldwide initiative called Death Over Dinner. 

A Southwest Florida research company said it has developed a medication to combat Zika. The pill is meant to treat people who’ve already contracted the mosquito-borne virus. 

Big Cypress National Preserve is now internationally known as a “Dark Sky Park.” That means it’s lessening light pollution to preserve the night sky in parts of Collier, Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties. 

Gov. Rick Scott put more than 1.5 million people under evacuation orders on the east coast Thursday in preparation for Hurricane Matthew. Many of them headed to Southwest Florida. Here's their story:  

As South Floridians evacuate ahead of Hurricane Matthew, experts warn this could spread the Zika virus. The storm is expected to hit the east coast—an area of the state with the most local Zika cases. Those fleeing Miami could also take the virus with them.

A Southwest Florida company is trying to prepare children for jobs operating unmanned aircrafts, as the industry continues to grow. Soaring Sky out of Fort Myers created a drone education curriculum. And it wants to implement this training in schools around the country.

A Southwest Florida company is benefiting from a major shift in how unmanned aircrafts, or “drones," are regulated. The new rules reduce the standards for who can fly the drones. This is allowing Fort Myers-based Soaring Sky to expand nationwide.  


UPDATE: If you think you've spotted  a New Guinea flatworm in your area, the recommendation is to not touch it, take a picture of it and report it to state wildlife officials at 888-IVE-GOT1.

An invasive flatworm could potentially threaten wildlife, and even people in Southwest Florida. The New Guinea Flatworm was first found in the state near Miami more than a year ago. Now, they’ve popped up in Cape Coral, and most recently, Sanibel Island. 


Federal lawmakers from Florida are criticizing the state’s recent decision to allow for higher levels of toxins in its waterways. They’re worried about public health because some of the toxins cause cancer.

The Florida Environmental Regulation Commission approved increased levels for about 20 different toxins in Florida surface waters, like rivers and estuaries. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency would still have to approve the move.

Nine members of Congress recently sent the EPA a letter voicing their concern.

Scientists found blue-green algae again in Southwest Florida waters this week. The toxic algae has been plaguing beaches on the east coast for weeks now.  Experts say this could get worse on both coasts now because of the summer heat.

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