Nadege Green

Reporter

 Nadege Green covers social justice issues for WLRN.

For her, journalism boils down to not only telling the stories of the people who are accessible, but also seeking out the voices we don't hear from, and telling those stories too.

Her work was received numerous awards, including a 2017 Regional Edward R. Murrow Award (Planning Funerals For Children Lost To Gun Violence), 2016 first place investigative reporting award from the National Association of Black Journalists and Florida AP Broadcaster awards.

In 2018 Green was recognized by the Miami Foundation with the Ruth Shack Leadership award for her body of work that gives voice to communities that are often not heard.

Green's reporting has appeared in the Miami Herald, NPR and PRI. Her work has also been cited in Teen Vogue, The Root, Refinery 29 and the Washington Post.

She previously worked at the Miami Herald covering city governments and the Haitian community. Green studied English with a specialization in professional writing at Barry University.

Follow her on Twitter @nadegegreen

Ways to Connect

Dieu Nalio Chery / Associated Press

Six months ago, reports of a violent massacre in the Port-au-Prince neighborhood of La Saline started to spread on Haitian social media and Whatsapp group messages.

Courtesy of Tabou Combo

Tabou Combo is one of the biggest bands to come out of Haiti. They're celebrating just over 50 years of being what they call the “ambassadors of konpa.”

They've taken their infectious blend of Haitian rhythms to the U.S. Africa Europe and throughout the Caribbean and Latin America.

And there's a good chance if you grew up in a Haitian household, Tabou Combo was always in rotation.

Yvon Andre, better known as Kapi, is one of the founding members of the band. He spoke to WLRN’s Nadege Green.

Nadege Green / WLRN

For the last couple of years, a school bus driver in Florida City has made prom possible for dozens of teenage girls in South Miami-Dade.

Regina Talabert spends a lot of time making calls and sending emails requesting donations of lightly used or new formal dresses leading up to prom season.

On a recent Saturday, the fruit of her work is on display inside the community room at City Church in Homestead, which has been transformed into a pop-up prom shop where everything is free.

Nadege Green / WLRN

South Florida is a hub for artists. But like many other working professionals in the region, artists often find they are priced out of affordable housing. 

Screengrab police bodycam video

A Miami-Dade police officer who was caught on video throwing a young black woman to the ground and arresting her after she called for help is now facing charges from that incident. 

Nadege Green / WLRN

WLRN is looking at the impact of children and teens killed by guns in South Florida through the voices of some of the people who are most affected.

You can find the entire series at wlrn.org/ownwords

Zamari Pierre-Louis was 16 years old when he was shot and killed in Miami Gardens on January 17, 2014. 

Five years later, his killing remains unsolved. 

Nadege Green / WLRN

This week is National Library Week and WLRN reporter Nadege Green talked to her childhood librarian.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Nine men rest on cots under a large white tent in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood. They call themselves “The Hunger Nine.”

They’re on Day 12 of a hunger strike to draw attention to the gun violence that disproportionately impacts black neighborhoods in Miami-Dade.

Daniel Rivero / WLRN

In collaboration with 70 Million, a national podcast that examines criminal justice reforms around the country, WLRN looked at the mechanisms of Miami-Dade County's Criminal Mental Health Project.

Nadege Green

The home of Miami’s first black millionaire is now open to the public.

Dana A. Dorsey was what today would be considered a real estate mogul. He was also a civic leader philanthropist in Miami’s black community.

The Black Archives History and Research Foundation of South Florida restored his 1920s era home and will use it as a museum to document Dorsey’s life and to host cultural events.

Timothy Barber, executive director of the Black Archives, spoke to WLRN’s Nadege Green about Dorsey's legacy.

Roi Lemayh

A new dance performance in Miami will take the influence of LGBTQ ballroom culture onto the stage.

“Vogue Extravaganza” pays homage to the ballroom scene that originated in New York, an underground subculture created by and for black and Latino gay and gender non-conforming young people.

Wikipedia Creative Commons

Black people, regardless of ethnicity or nationality, fare worse than white Americans and other groups that identify as white, according to a new study that looks at the accumulation of wealth in the South Florida region.

“The Color of Wealth” examines the wealth disparities that exist across racial and ethnic groups in West Palm Beach, Miami-Dade and Broward counties. 

South Florida has a significant Hispanic population, 43 percent. But when broken down by race, white Hispanics have significantly better economic outcomes than black Hispanics, the authors found. 

Alexia Fodere / Miami Herald

The Wharf Miami is one of the go-to places along the Miami River.

Sunday evening, when Miami DJ Sam Sneak tried to get into the outdoor culinary and music space, he said he was turned away for violating their dress code, according to posts on his Instagram and Twitter accounts.

Courtesy of Annie Segarra

Annie Segarra is a disability rights activist from South Miami-Dade. She uses Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to talk about living with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a connective tissue disorder.

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