Nancy Klingener

Reporter

Nancy Klingener covers the Florida Keys for WLRN. Since moving to South Florida in 1989, she has worked for the Miami Herald, Solares Hill newspaper and the Monroe County Public Library.

She is a Spring 2014 graduate of the Transom Story Workshop. She is on the board of the Key West Literary Seminar and reviews books for the Miami Herald. 

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Online home renting sites like Airbnb have greatly expanded the vacation rental market — when travelers rent a home or apartment instead of a hotel room.

Two new studies illustrate the impact that's having on the Florida Keys.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

There's a reason Key West was the inspiration for the song Margaritaville. The island runs on booze.

Tourists and the Duval Crawl — that’s the obvious. There are towns where it might be frowned upon for locals to start the day with a beer, or even a shot of tequila. Key West is not one of those towns. 

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Initial reporting can leave lasting impressions after a hurricane — and that can be really damaging to a tourism destination.

Monroe County Sheriff's Office

Students in the Keys are "starting with hello" this week, part of a program developed by Sandy Hook Promise.

At Poinciana Elementary School in Key West, that work took the shape of 600 small bodies spelling out the word "hello" and a smile.

"At the elementary level, it's a lot about inclusion," said Ilinke Royse, a Spanish teacher at the school who runs the new SAVE Promise Club.

Warren Leamard / Special to WLRN

Keys residents were surprised to find saltwater on the streets Tuesday morning, well before the weekend's king tides.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Green iguanas are invasive exotics and in South Florida, their numbers have exploded. They eat vegetation and sometimes bird eggs. And they dig into the ground, destabilizing canal banks, bridge pilings — and at the Key West cemetery, grave sites.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

For years, the city of Key West and Monroe County have been at odds about the location of the city's homeless shelter. But they may have reached a resolution.

This post was updated at at 12:15 p.m. on Sept. 12

The prospect of genetically modified mosquitoes is back for the Florida Keys — just as a new study raises concerns about the technology.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Anyone who's been to the beach in South Florida or the Caribbean in recent months has probably seen — or smelled — sargassum piled up on shore. The algae is hitting record levels.

In the Keys, some want their local governments to address the problem.

Monroe County Sheriff's Office

Two people were killed in a small plane crash off Marathon Sunday morning, according to the Monroe County Sheriff's Office.

The 1961 Cessna 210 Centurion crashed into the water near Rachel Key, a small island off Marathon's gulf side.

The two people, whose identities have not been released, are believed to be the only two on board the plane, according to the sheriff's office.

Fish and Wildlife Research Institute / FWC

All of the Florida Keys reef is under thermal stress — meaning the water is warm enough that corals may start bleaching.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

There's one drawbridge left along the Overseas Highway, the only road connecting the Florida Keys. As of Sunday, Sept. 8, that bridge will be closed at night for maintenance five nights a week.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

The 1935 Labor Day Hurricane that slammed Islamorada was the strongest Atlantic hurricane landfall on record — until Sunday, when Hurricane Dorian tied it in the Bahamas.

On Monday, residents of Islamorada gathered for the annual Labor Day service at the Hurricane Memorial on Upper Matecumbe Key. They were thinking of hurricanes past — and present.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

U.S. Fish & Wildlife officials Thursday evening faced a crowd of Keys residents strongly opposed to removing the Key deer from the Endangered Species List.

The Turtle Hospital

He's not from around these parts. Yet somehow he's here.

Harry, an Olive Ridley sea turtle, was found floating roughly six miles offshore Tavernier in February. He had injuries from being tangled up in a fishing net on all four flippers.   

He was treated with antibiotics, nutrition via IV, laser therapy and more, including lots of fish, shrimp and squid. He's recovered enough that he's scheduled for release at Higgs Beach in Key West at 10 a.m. Thursday.

Harry will carry a satellite transmitter for tracking.

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