2020 elections

Updated at 3:25 p.m. ET

California Sen. Kamala Harris is dropping out of the presidential race, citing a lack of funds. She informed her campaign staff of the decision on a conference call and later sent an email to supporters, in which she wrote "my campaign for president simply doesn't have the financial resources we need to continue."

It’s dubbed a “jungle” primary system. And the Florida Republican and Democratic parties want no part of it.

Now, the Florida Supreme Court will decide whether a proposed constitutional amendment that would overhaul the state’s primary-election system will go before voters in November 2020.

LA Johnson / NPR

The Thanksgiving table sometimes serves as a therapeutic forum for airing personal and political grievances.

This year, South Florida families will have a lot of fodder: the upcoming 2020 presidential election; the threat of rising seas; and even football, namely a historic recent win by Florida International University against the University of Miami Hurricanes.

WLRN wants to hear from you. What topics are you bringing up on Turkey Day?

President Donald Trump will take another step toward becoming a full-time #FloridaMan with a “homecoming” rally Tuesday in Sunrise.

In late September, the president and First Lady Melania Trump officially "relocated" their residence from New York to the Sunshine State, where Trump has long owned property in Palm Beach County.

Former Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel, ousted following the Parkland high school massacre, is suing over his removal from office.

Associated Press

Around this time last year, the political sphere zeroed in on Broward County, which was dealing with a crucial recount in a couple of statewide races. The office has recently dealt with another blunder, according to the South Florida Sun Sentinel. More than 50,000 voters received a “final notice” mailer that threatened to designate them inactive voters. 

Updated at 9:05 a.m. ET

Candidates seeking the Democratic presidential nomination took to the debate stage for the fifth time Wednesday night. There weren't any groundbreaking or game-changing moments, but here are five things that stood out:

1. Impeachment hearings may have taken some steam out of the debate

Let's face it: The biggest story of Wednesday was not the debate, it was the impeachment testimony of Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union.

Getty Images via Sun Sentinel

Wayne Messam, the mayor of Miramar, suspended his campaign for president Wednesday.

Messam entered the race in March with a polished video and a large rally.

Amid a slew of public impeachment hearings, Democratic presidential candidates are gathering in Atlanta to debate once again. This round also comes less than three months before the first primaries and caucuses.

Ten candidates made the cut, down from a record of 12 in October's debate.

The country is witnessing one of only a handful of times in its history that Congress has gone through with public hearings on whether to impeach a president. And yet, the overwhelming majority of Americans across parties say nothing they hear in the inquiry will change their minds on impeachment, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Updated at 8:40 p.m ET

Two witnesses called by Republicans in the House impeachment inquiry testified Tuesday, indicating they had reservations over the content of President Trump's July 25th phone call with the president of Ukraine, and his desire to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden.

AIDS Healthcare Foundation
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

The nonprofit The AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF) is working on a ballot initiative for Fort Lauderdale voters to consider on the next general elections, on November 3, 2020.

The ordinance would try to prevent alleged discrimination when affordable housing developments get considered.

 

Ray Stepnowski / Courtesy

Broward’s supervisor of elections says he didn’t mean to scare 146,000 people who received “final notices” from his office threatening to designate them as an “inactive voter.”

After receiving complaints from several voters who questioned why they were receiving the notices — they vote regularly and have not changed their address in years — Supervisor Pete Antonacci said Wednesday he’s going to apologize to all who got the mailer.

Ten Democratic candidates will debate next week in the fifth primary face-off, which has increasing importance, with presidential hopefuls set to face voters in fewer than three months.

Don't see the video? Click here.

The field of 2020 presidential candidates with health care overhaul plans is crowded, and Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Ind., is drawing lines of distinction between his proposal and his competitors' plans.

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