activists

SOUTH FLORIDA SUN SENTINEL

Drivers zip down Sistrunk Boulevard, the historic main street in the historically black northwest section of Fort Lauderdale, without giving much thought to the large sign identifying one of its most prominent features: The Reverend Samuel Delevoe Memorial Park.

Others stop to play basketball or volleyball, use the outdoor fitness station or the indoor computer lab, or visit the adjacent African American Research Library and Cultural Center.

On a recent, cloudy fall afternoon, Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin stood outside the governor's mansion in Frankfort, flanked by a couple dozen activists in blue T-shirts, holding signs that read, "I Vote Pro-Life."

"It took me a while to figure out why I keep seeing these blue T-shirts," Bevin joked as he turned to the volunteers. "I wasn't sure who you were, but I'm just grateful to you."

These activists have been door-knocking across Kentucky on Bevin's behalf, to reach 200,000 voters before the election on Nov. 5.

MIKE STOCKER / South Florida Sun Sentinel

That spiffy county pet shelter that opened three years ago isn’t so spiffy these days.

That’s according to an out-of-state expert sent in to do a surprise inspection of the $16.5 million shelter by Mark Bogen, mayor of Broward County.

“The conclusion … was that our shelter was filthy, dirty, poor ventilation in some of the rooms and certain protocols and standards need to be implemented,” Bogen said in an email to one animal activist.

DONNA E. NATALE PLANAS / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Activists fighting to preserve a slice of one of the world’s rarest forests lost what was likely the last legal battle to stop the imperiled ecosystem from turning into a Walmart-anchored development.

Miami Herald Archive

Sister Jeanne O’Laughlin, the Adrian Dominican nun whose ambitious academic agenda and prodigious fundraising skills transformed once-modest Barry University, died early Tuesday morning at the Motherhouse of the Adrian Dominican Sisters in Michigan where she had been living for several years.

The Miami civic activist and the Michigan native was 90, and had survived lung cancer in 1996.

O’Laughlin, who preferred civilian clothes to a nun’s habit, became Barry’s president in 1981, overseeing 2,000 students at a small cluster of 16 buildings in Miami Shores.

It's been almost four years since Patrisse Khan-Cullors helped birth the hashtag #blacklivesmatter. Those three words gained national attention for demonstrations against police brutality and grew into a movement.

But progress has been slow, admits Khan-Cullors, a Los Angeles-based activist who co-founded the Black Lives Matter Network.

Amanda Rabines

No, election season is not over for Democrats. In fact, judging by the crowds and the speeches at the James L. Knight Center in Miami on Wednesday night, you would think it's in full swing. 

More than 2,000 people showed up to hear Vermont senator and former presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, along with chair of the National Democratic Committee Tom Perez, at the latest stop of their "Come Together and Fight Back" tour,  aimed at building activism within the Democratic party. 

Democrats have a long way to go to rebuild their party after brutal losses across the board last November. But they're seeing glimmers of hope in recent and upcoming special elections where they argue the backlash to President Trump is resulting in change at the ballot box.

This weekend, hundreds of thousands of Americans will be taking to the streets — some to celebrate, some to protest the inauguration and others to demonstrate for issues that the president-elect cares about.

If you happen to be one of those people, you might have this nagging question in the back of your mind: Will any of it make a difference?

Kate Stein / WLRN

 

 

Norteño music developed along the Texas-Mexico border. It blends the instruments of mariachi with the rhythms of polka. And now, one of norteño's most popular bands is hoping its music will get more Latinos to the polls.

Los Tigres del Norte -- The Tigers of the North -- have been putting out norteño hits for four decades. The band performed in West Palm Beach on Feb. 19. A lot of its songs touch on social and political issues: immigration, workers' rights, drug trafficking, political representation.

The People's Climate March Takes Miami

Sep 22, 2014
Lisann Ramos

The People’s Climate March Sunday included more than 2,000 events in over 150 countries.  

In Miami, a group of about 100 people spent Sunday afternoon handing out T-shirts, putting on costumes and coloring posters at the Freedom Tower. Many of those posters focused on the effects of sea-level rise.

Jonathan Ullman works with the Sierra Club, one of the organizers of Miami’s march.

nader.org/books/unstoppable

07/07/14 - Monday’s Topical Currents delves into our fractious politics and the need for convergent action if we are to reassert the will of the people. Attorney, author, political activist, and four-time presidential candidate, Ralph Nader has a new book that lays out the path forward.

The Forgotten Heyday of American Activism

Oct 7, 2013
www.banksy.co.uk

10/07/13 - Monday’s Topical Currents is with political culture professor Michael Stewart Foley.  He’s written FRONT PORCH POLITICS: The Forgotten Heyday of American Activism in the 1970s and 1980s.  Most people remember the 1960s as the decade of activism, but Foley contends the 1970s and 1980s were equally important.

Liz Coursen, americanpostcardart.com

In this digital age, when vacationers to South Florida can grab their smartphones and send jealousy-inducing photos to friends and family within seconds, it’s hard to believe the humble postcard is still hanging in there.

Visit most any local souvenir shop and there they are, usually on one or two racks tucked behind the seashell bracelets and painted coconuts.  But Sarasota author Liz Coursen doesn’t think much of the postcards being sent from Florida these days.

C. DiMattei

If you’re looking for Boynton Beach’s arts district, you won’t find it near any trendy restaurants or high-end boutiques.  Actually, the closest business is an auto shop and the nearest place to grab a bite to eat is a gas station on the corner.

But if no one took this artists’ enclave seriously 18 months ago . . .

“ . . . they do now!” exclaims Rolando Chang Barrero.

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