apps

Paige Thesing has struggled with insomnia since high school. "It takes me a really long time to fall asleep — about four hours," she says. For years, her mornings were groggy and involved a "lot of coffee."

After a year of trying sleep medication prescribed by her doctor, she turned to the internet for alternate solutions. About four months ago, she settled on a mobile phone meditation app called INSCAPE.

At midnight, Oct. 1, the rush begins.

The city of Miami launched a partnership on Wednesday with a neighborhood watch social network in order to help police investigate crimes and share safety alerts. 

'Neighbors' by the doorbell security company, Ring, is a free app that allows residents of a neighborhood to collect and share with each other videos and photos of suspicious activity. Thousands of people in Miami already use Ring's security system, according to the company's representatives, and the city's police hope Neighbors will help them solve crimes faster. 

Miami Herald

Students in South Florida could soon have an app to help them with their mental health. Teacher Samantha Pratt came up with the idea as a way for students to find help dealing with personal or school stressors. The app, called Klickengage, would also let teachers know the mental states of their students before the school day gets underway.

Flickr

Irma? There's an app for that.

Officials are encouraging South Florida residents to download smartphone apps for last-minute storm prep and to keep updated during the hurricane and its aftermath.

Among the suggested apps:

Florida Power and Light app: To monitor power outages

Florida 511: For real-time traffic updates

Gas Buddy: Shows gas stations and prices based on location