art

Provided by Florida International University Frost Art Museum

A teacher banged a wooden spoon on the bottom of a saucepan. That, plus honking horns and the standard graduation songs — “Pomp and Circumstance” and Vitamin C’s 1999 hit "Graduation (Friends Forever)" — were the soundtrack of a coronavirus-style drive-through celebration at a Miami-Dade County public school last week.

The graduates weren’t high school seniors, though.

Luis Hernandez

The coronavirus pandemic may haved forced arts venues to shut down, but that doesn't mean South Florida artists have slowed down.

We've found that many are staying connected with their audiences through social media and live-streaming events. Everywhere you look, local theater companies, playwrights, musicians, actors, dancers, choreographers, spoken-word and visual artists are hosting such online happenings.

WLRN's new series called "Intermission" is covering how the arts in South Florida are trying to stay healthy throughout the crisis.

Behold Miami-Dade's Art In Public Places, One Of The Largest Public Collections In U.S.

Apr 30, 2020

Miami has become known as a global capital for the visual arts – thanks to the artists who make the city home, and aided internationally by the attention of the annual Miami Art Week crowds each December.

Fewer know, however, that Miami-Dade County is also home to one of the largest public art collections in the United States.

A painting by Vincent van Gogh was stolen early Monday morning from a Dutch museum in what appeared to be a smash-and-grab from the institution's front entrance.

The painting, an 1884 work titled The Parsonage Garden at Nuenen in Spring 1884, had been on loan to the Singer Laren museum near Amsterdam. It is part of the permanent collection of the Groninger Museum, in the northern part of the Netherlands.

Daniel Rivero / WLRN

On this Tuesday, March 10, episode of Sundial:

Grand Bahama’s Water Quality 

Six months after Hurricane Dorian, the only fresh drinking water available in Grand Bahama is coming from relief groups. The Category 5 storm contaminated the drinking supply with saltwater. 

“Dorian didn’t just impact some of the wells. It impacted all of our wells and our plants,” Remington Wilchcombe, the manager of engineering at Grand Bahama Utility Company told WLRN’s Danny Rivero.

Madeline Fox / WLRN

Much like many snowbirds this time of year, two art exhibits have made their way to South Florida from New York City.

The Norton Museum of Art is hosting a collection of Robert Rauschenberg’s work, comprising five decades of the pioneering modern artist’s sculpture, prints and mixed media on loan from the Whitney Museum of Art.

Black history
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Old Dillard Museum was the first public school built for black students in Fort Lauderdale. In the 1920s, Dr. Joseph A. Ely was its principal.

He went on to be principal at what is now Attucks Middle School in Hollywood.    

A recently opened art exhibit, "Ode to South Broward," honors Ely's contribution to black education and also pays homage to four historically black neighborhoods in that part of the county: Liberia in Hollywood, Danie in Dania Beach, Carver Ranches and Northwest Hallandale Beach. 

Anastasia Samoylova

Since 2016, Russian-American photographer Anastasia Samoylova has been capturing images of sea-level rise in South Florida in quiet — and often surprising — ways.

A lot of my free time is spent doodling. I'm a journalist on NPR's science desk by day. But all the time in between, I am an artist — specifically, a cartoonist.

I draw in between tasks. I sketch at the coffee shop before work. And I like challenging myself to complete a zine — a little magazine — on my 20-minute bus commute.

Alejandra Martinez / WLRN

Three baby dolls hang from a white canvas at the Lowe Art Museum in Coral Gables. The art installation has painted message written in Spanish that reads: "Tu odio no me mata. Soy human igual que tu." or "Your hate doesn’t kill me. I am human the same as you." 

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

A couple weeks ago during Art Basel, the news was all about fruit as art — specifically a banana duct-taped to the wall that went for $120,000.

But there was other fruit-related art news in South Florida at the same time that didn't get quite as much attention.

Shepherds in Christmas Nativity scenes that were painted, carved or sculpted hundreds of years ago sometimes have throats with large, abnormal growths.

These are realistic depictions of goiter, an enlargement of the thyroid gland caused by iodine deficiency. The condition was common in those days in northern Italy, where the soil and water are depleted of iodine.

Madeline Fox / WLRN

The artist Georgia O’Keeffe is most famous for her paintings of flowers, New York skyscrapers, and the American Southwest.

A new exhibit at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach turns its eye to a less-studied image O’Keeffe constructed – her own.

It’s the first show to incorporate O’Keeffe’s clothing alongside her paintings and photographs of her. West Palm Beach is the show’s seventh and final stop.

SACHA MEDICI / Twitter via Miami Herald

The now-iconic white wall that once held a duct-taped banana at Art Basel Miami Beach was vandalized on Sunday afternoon, forcing exhibitors to cover up the writing in red lipstick with a white cardboard.

The banana, which has attracted hundreds after it sold to an art collector for $120,000, was replaced with the phrase “Epstien (sic) didn’t kill himself,” written with red lipstick.

The scene confused some who were in the gallery, most who assumed it was just another performance.

Karli Evans

When you walk through the installation, “Black Power Naps/Siestas Negras” you’re automatically sucked into a world of relaxation. There are six embellished beds and a sound track playing where the Afro Latinx artists Navild Acosta and Fannie Sosa explain what the concept of sleep means to them in a deep soothing voice.

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