arts

Can you feel that change in the air?  Never mind the fact that the seasons in Miami are mostly a social construct, the art season is upon us.

While we remain hopeful for a significant temperature drop in mid-October, novelist Tom Wolfe is forecasted to drop his latest work Back to Blood on October 23rd.  Set in Miami, the novel explores the multi-ethnic urban jungle of South Florida - and all the perceived class struggles that entails.

The Nine Best Blocks In South Florida

Oct 10, 2012
Albert Harum-Alvarez

For the first time since the 1920’s, young people across the United States are migrating back to the urban cores, and leaving the suburbs behind, according to U.S. Census data.

Tom Wolfe Documentary Premieres In Miami

Oct 9, 2012
Medusahead

Tom Wolfe’s latest novel, Back to Blood, takes place in Miami. It won’t be out until later in the month, but a new documentary about the years Wolfe spent here researching the book premieres Tuesday, October 9 at O Cinema in Wynwood.

Coconut Grove Playhouse Set For State Takeover

Oct 4, 2012
ImageMD / flickriver.com

The nonprofit board of the Coconut Grove Playhouse has decided not to try to block the state from coming in and taking back the historic 1926 theater. 

That means the state could be in charge of the facility by next week. 

The theater has been closed for six years because of financial problems and there are still unresolved claims against it.

However, Miami-Dade County has set aside $20 million designated for the theater and there is a strong possibility the Playhouse could be deeded to the county by the state.

Christine DiMattei

The disco craze that took the world by storm nearly 40 years ago was born in New York City, right?

Maybe not.

A theatrical experience celebrating 1970's disco comes to the Adrienne Arsht Center tonight.  And while it’s hundreds of miles away from the streets John Travolta struts down in “Saturday Night Fever,” it turns out Miami played a major role in the disco craze.

Taking The Plunge

May 9, 2012
Alicia Zuckerman

UPDATE  June 6, 2013 14:43 p.m.: (AP) Esther Williams, the swimming champion turned actress who starred in glittering and aquatic Technicolor musicals of the 1940s and 1950s, has died. She was 91.

Williams died early Thursday in her sleep, according to her longtime publicist Harlan Boll.

Following in the footsteps of Sonja Henie, who went from skating champion to movie star, Williams became one of Hollywood's biggest moneymakers, appearing in spectacular swimsuit numbers that capitalized on her wholesome beauty and perfect figure.

 

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

 Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  

She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

On an icy night in late December, Miami native Robert Battle, the new artistic director of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, saw his past and future come together in the heart of New York City.

After a year and a half of public grooming, of working alongside his towering predecessor, Judith Jamison, Battle was finally at the head of modern dance's most famous company, and in programming the troupe's annual five-week season at City Center Theatre, a major event in the New York dance world, he had made his real debut as director.

Muralist Makes His Mark In Little Haiti

Sep 14, 2011
Trina Sargalski

If you’ve ever visited Little Haiti, you’ve probably seen Miami muralist Serge Toussaint’s work, which is sprinkled throughout the city. How can you tell it’s his work? His signature is a dollar sign instead of an “S” in Serge. He spends most of his time in Little Haiti, but his work can be seen in Liberty City, Little River, Allapattah, the Miami River and all the way to Fort Lauderdale.

Alicia Zuckerman

When you stop and listen to your surroundings, what do you hear? We take sound for granted because it’s around us all the time. But when you are forced to listen in a different way, you hear a different story.

Under the Sun is pleased to announce that we won a grant to produce an episode about all things literary in South Florida.   This third episode aired on Saturday, June 27 at noon on WLRN 91.3 FM and WKWM 91.5 FM.  We are excited to bring you this program about writing and the arts throughout our communities. 

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