black communities

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald file

Garth C. Reeves Sr., publisher emeritus of The Miami Times and a voice for the aspirations of African Americans in Miami for most of the past century, died on Monday.

He was 100.

Josh Ritchie / South Florida Sun Sentinel

W. George Allen, a hugely influential figure in Broward history and its black community, has died, his family confirmed Thursday. He was 83.

In 1962, Allen became the first African-American to graduate from the University of Florida. He once said: “I was admitted to Harvard and the University of California at Berkeley, but I’m a native Floridian, and I felt that somebody had to integrate the University of Florida. The racists told me I didn’t belong there and I’d never graduate.”

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

The American Black Film Festival, an annual event that brings together emerging black filmmakers and artists, wrapped up it’s last day in South Florida over the weekend.

Gerard Albert III / WLRN News

While barbers swept fallen hair from the floor of Fweago Cutz barber shop, guests and volunteers set up folding chairs and a projector.

After the lights were off and the crowd was seated, Jefferson Noel pressed play.

The community organizer rented out the barbershop to screen the new Netflix series, "When They See Us." More importantly, he set up a candid panel discussion with former public defendants and activists in the community to discuss the issues that come up in the story.

Terrisa Mark / WLRN News

A floating digital billboard in the ocean off South Beach Monday afternoon aimed to make black visitors feel relaxed and at home at the beach. 

The project, called “Water Rights,” was created by artist Johanne Rahaman with support from the Knight Foundation and a $20,000 grant from Oolite Arts, a local organization that fosters visual artists. 

ACLU

A new study looks at the disparate treatment of black adult criminal defendants in Miami-Dade County.

“Unequal treatment: Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Miami-Dade Criminal Justice,” finds black Hispanics and black non-Hispanics are overrepresented in local jails and face harsher penalties as they make their way through the court system.