Broward Schools

Broward Schools Give Big Raises To Administrators

Sep 28, 2018
Joe Rimkus Jr. / Miami Herald

The Broward County School District gave 11 district administrators big raises last school year, and then warned the public it was short on money.

The raises ranged from 7 percent to 21 percent, well above the 2.2 percent increases approved for most district employees. None of the 11 employees received promotions but continued to work in their same jobs. District officials said the raises were given to ensure employees received competitive pay so they would stay in the district.

The employees include:

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

The mother of a Parkland shooting victim who campaigned on making schools safer was elected to the Broward County school board on Tuesday, as four incumbents fended off challengers — for now.

Lori Alhadeff, who lost her daughter, Alyssa, at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, was elected to the open seat in the district that includes Parkland with 65 percent of the vote. That’s more than three times the support earned by each of her opponents.

Voters Approve Property Tax To Give Broward Teachers Six Percent Raise

Aug 29, 2018
Sun Sentinel

Broward voters put aside their concerns about school district financial management and approved a new property tax earmarked for teachers, school security officers and student mental health care.

The tax is expected to raise $93 million a year, most of which will be used to give teachers a 6 percent raise. The higher pay will last for four years and would have to be renewed by voters in 2022 to continue.

Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Two parents of Parkland shooting victims have launched formidable campaigns for the Broward County school board, and their efforts to overhaul the leadership of the nation's sixth-largest school district could be seen as a referendum on its superintendent.

Five of the district's nine school board seats are on the Aug. 28 ballot. Currently, a majority of board members in Broward support superintendent Robert Runcie. But these elections could change that.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

Broward County school board races are usually niche affairs as passionate advocates futilely implore an indifferent public to care, even a decade ago when the nation's sixth-largest district was rocked by bribery and construction scandals.

But February's massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School changed that as the parents of two victims and close friends of two others are vying for seats in Tuesday's election, pitting victims' families against incumbents and the teachers union and bringing out accusations of incompetence, lying, bigotry, and polling place harassment.

Broward Schools
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Nearly a week after Marjory Stoneman Douglas parents gathered to criticize the Broward County School Board and its leadership, state and county leaders gathered to show support for Superintendent Robert Runcie.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Members of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission drilled presenters from the Department of Education Friday, on the second and final day of meetings for this month.

Jose Iglesias / Miami Herald

Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie is facing questions about honesty and transparency – so much so that he opened a community forum Monday by stating that he was not a liar.

Charles Trainor Jr.

Broward County is taking a closer look at how schools address punishment amid criticism that its controversial PROMISE program encouraged a culture of lax discipline throughout the district.

CARL JUSTE / Miami Herald

Guests for Sundial Thursday, April 5, 2018:

The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting changed the way school districts think about safety. 

Law enforcement officials, lawmakers, teachers, parents and especially students have been advocating for schools to uphold the highest standards of safety. 

Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie has been working tirelessly to find a way to insure the safety of the children in his district with Stoneman Douglas serving as ground zero. 

Matias Ocner / WLRN News

A heavy police presence and a steady stream of well-wishers — some with two legs and some with four — were on hand Wednesday morning as students returned to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High for the first day of classes since the school shooting two weeks ago that killed 17 people and injured 15 others.

Caitlin Switalski

Broward County school board members  say schools and churches need to pay more attention to the mental health needs of children. 

School Board Members Robin Bartleman and Rosalind Osgood held each other and cried underneath the Sawgrass Expressway after  a press conference Thursday in which the Broward Sheriff's Office gave updates on the massacre that killed 17 and injured 14 at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School.

Bartleman said the demands on guidance counselors and social workers in schools is “astronomical.”

CDC

Schools and school districts are among those reacting to news of 14  locally-acquired cases of the Zika virus confirmed in South Florida.

With the first day of school still weeks away, Miami-Dade County Public Schools sent out an automated voicemail to parents last week reinforcing basic anti-mosquito measures.

The recording advised parents to wear "long-sleeved shirts and long pants," to "apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing  and use mosquito netting with children younger than two months." 

Nicole Poulin

What should a school do when parents don’t want their kids to take a standardized test?  Public school students across Florida are in the midst of testing season, and state law says the tests are mandatory; there’s no formal mechanism to “opt out.” But plenty of Florida parents are instructing their children to do just that.

Carl Juste / The Miami Herald

Recently, the Sun-Sentinel reported that the Broward County School District may have to return $23 million  in federal Title 1 funds. The story said the district improperly distributed those funds, according to an auditor-general report. 

Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie took issue with the report and had a letter published in the Sun-Sentinel challenging the story's claims.

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