burmese pythons

Daniel Varela / Miami Herald

On this Tuesday, March 3, episode of Sundial:

Guatemalan migrant camp in South Miami-Dade

Deep in South Miami-Dade, tucked between nurseries, vegetable fields and fruit crops there are migrant camps of mostly Guatemalan children. 

“They live like a family, a little village, but in horrible conditions,” says Miami Herald immigration reporter Monique O. Madan.

A new camera that uses special wavelengths of light could help Florida in its fight against the invasive Burmese python.

Frank Ridgley / Zoo Miami

Invasive snake populations in the Everglades continue to have devastating impacts on the ecosystem. 

Burmese Pythons, North African Pythons and Boa Constrictors have reduced the population of fur bearing animals by 99 percent, according to scientists. Since 2007, Zoo Miami has been working with the National Park Service, the United States Geological Services and the University of Florida to manage and eradicate invasive species from the Everglades.

Burmese pythons, the voracious invader of the Everglades blamed for wiping out small mammals, may now be feasting another marsh resident: wading birds.

Florida's lieutenant governor joined hunters paid by the state to stalk and shoot invasive Burmese pythons in the Everglades.

Jeremy Dixon / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

 Burmese pythons have established themselves in the Everglades — and now they appear to be breeding in the Florida Keys, according to state and federal wildlife agencies.