City of Miami

ROBERTO KOLTUN / EL NUEVO HERALD STAFF

The City of Miami will ask voters in November whether or not to make the city mayor the most powerful individual in the city government’s power structure. 

Matias Ocner / Miami Herald

In a surprise move, the Miami City Commission on Thursday unanimously voted down a contract for Ultra Music Festival to stay in Bayfront Park.

Caught in the fray of a political grudge match between two commissioners and mixed public opinion, Ultra Music Festival’s future in downtown Miami was dealt a significant setback when commissioners rejected the contract. Downtown residents who oppose the festival left City Hall smiling and high-fiving each other as festival organizers quietly conferred outside the commission chambers.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

Monday marked the first day of a three day trial between the City of Miami and its homeless population.

The class action lawsuit was filed by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in May on behalf of the area's homeless after the City of Miami attempted to terminate a 20-year-old agreement that governs how police can treat the homeless. 

Daniel Rivero / WLRN

The city of Miami could be hiking the price to park for nonresidents.

 

City commissioners are considering increasing the hourly rate to $3.25 an hour in some neighborhoods. Rates would increase for public parking lots, garages and curbside spots.

Joey Flechas jflechas@miamiherald.com

Miami's government might raise parking rates across the city for the first time since 2009, in some cases by as much as $1.50 per hour. The reason city administrators give for the hike is simple: The city needs more money.

The amount of increase would depend on the neighborhood. Some high-demand areas such as downtown, Brickell, and Wynwood would see greater hikes than Little River, Calle Ocho and Coral Way, widening the gap between rates in different parts of the city.

Nadege Green

Johny Silionord points to the gaping hole in the floor when he opens the front door to his first-floor apartment in Little Haiti.

“Look at this. This is what I’m paying for,” he says in Creole.

Three white buckets sit alongside a wall in his room. They come in handy to collect the water that pours through the ceiling during a rainstorm or to catch the water that seeps through when his upstairs neighbor flushes the toilet.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

David Beckham’s longtime fantasy of bringing Major League Soccer to Miami will have to wait another week for answers, after a contentious meeting before the city commission didn’t exactly go as planned.

In the bid to build a soccer stadium and sports complex in Miami, developers have set their sites on a larger location: a city-owned municipal golf course next to Miami International Airport.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

Facing strong opposition from climate-change groups, Miami on Thursday backed down from a change critics said would undermine the city's quest to position itself as the shining example of how a city should prepare for climate change.

@Atomiko, Atomik's official Instagram page.

Guests for Sundial Tuesday, April 3, 2018:

The city of Miami established the Sea-Level Rise Committee in 2015 to study the effects of sea-level rise on the city and recommend policy changes to help combat rising sea levels.

In 2017, taxpayers agreed to a $400 million bond for resilience projects, $192 million of which is to be spent on efforts to help curb the effects of rising seas.

The committee meets monthly to discuss how to help Miami officials create plans that inclusively and equitably prepare for sea-level rise.

Florida Center for Environmental Studies

An ugly moment at a meeting of Miami's sea-level rise committee last week has prompted controversy over one of its members and a discussion over the committee's mission.

Allison Diaz / Miami Herald File Photo

Guests for Sundial on Thursday, March 29, 2018:

Jorge Colina had been with the Miami Police Department for 28 years before he was promoted to police chief this past January. 

When he got the job, he said: "There's no reason why we can't be one of the safest cities in the country. Reducing gun violence is the priority. I have no sympathy if you chose to use a firearm to commit a crime."

Jose Iglesias / Miami

Guests for Sundial Tuesday Feb. 27:

City of Miami Mayor Francis Suarez spoke on the importance of technology and how he plans to use it to make the city safer and elevate Miami's status as an economic hub.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High senior Demitri Hoth spoke to us about returning to school on Wednesday after the Feb. 14 mass shooting. 

Zak Stern, better known as Zak The Baker, told us how his quest for self-fulfillment led him to open a kosher bakery and deli that has become a Miami staple.

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

Miami city commissioners unanimously passed a resolution on Thursday urging the federal government to extend Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Haitians and Central Americans and to find a permanent solution for Dreamers under DACA.

This resolution was sponsored by every commissioner and the mayor. The designation offers temporary U.S. residency to immigrants fleeing disasters and political instability in their homelands. 

Miami’s New, Homegrown Mayor Has A ‘Mandate’ And A Big Agenda

Nov 8, 2017
Jose Iglesias / Miami Herald

After an eight-year breather from ambitious plans and metropolitan agendas, Miami has put its faith in a new, young mayor and political scion eager to get moving on a big agenda.

Voters on Tuesday elected City Commissioner Francis Suarez as the 34th mayor of Miami, choosing the 40-year-old Carlton Fields attorney and son of a former mayor and embracing his talk of a new vision and generation of leadership for the capital of the Americas.

A huge favorite over an underwhelming field, Suarez unofficially netted about 86 percent of the vote.

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