climate change

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

On this Monday, Feb. 24, episode of Sundial:

South Florida woman given clemency by Trump

Last week, President Donald Trump announced 11 pardons and commutations in high-profile cases. 

Among them: Judith Negron, a South Florida woman who was convicted in a $200 million Medicare fraud scheme 10 years ago. 

Courtesy of Florida International University's Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management

On this Thursday, Feb. 20, episode of Sundial:

Environmental reporter moderates presidential debate

The Democratic presidential debate in Nevada was moderated by its first climate journalist, Vanessa Hauc. 

"The Democratic field takes [climate change] very seriously," Hauc says. "Right now, we have a clear understanding of what is happening to our planet."

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Coping with storm surge fueled by rising seas in the Keys means elevating homes, buyouts in vulnerable areas, protecting important places like hospitals and wastewater plants and stabilizing parts of the Overseas Highway that could get washed out in storms.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced Monday he is committing $10 billion to fight climate change, which he calls "the biggest threat to our planet."

Bezos says the funds will go toward the creation of the Bezos Earth Fund.

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

A new exhibition at the Museum of Discovery and Science in Fort Lauderdale explores the history and science of dinosaurs.

Through animatronic dinosaur displays and examples of the latest technology used by paleontologists in the field, children are exposed to the science and profession of those continuing to study creatures from the Mesozoic era.

AP

Among scientists, conveying uncertainty in predictions over sea rise, increasing temperatures and other impacts linked to climate change — without suggesting doubt — remains a nagging challenge.

Study: Tweets About Flooded Miami Streets Come Before The Actual Floods

Feb 4, 2020
PEDRO PORTAL / Miami Herald

When water levels start to rise in Miami, pictures and videos quickly pop up on social media of cars fording deep puddles, and tourists trying to keep their luggage dry.

ACHMAD IBRAHIM / ASSOCIATED PRESS

On this Wednesday, Jan. 29, episode of Sundial:

A local infectious-disease expert on Coronavirus

Thousands of visitors are descending upon Miami for the Super Bowl LIV this weekend and with concerns about the coronavirus, Miami International Airport has installed quarantine stations with dedicated Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff to screen for the disease.

http://miamisearise.com/

Several Florida students are continuing a legal fight over climate change inaction. They're suing the governor and other state lawmakers for not doing enough about climate change. They claim their future is in jeopardy.

Alex Harris / Miami Herald

Experts are once again telling Miami Beach to raise its roads against the threat of rising seas, this time even higher. And once again, residents are pushing back hard.

City-hired consultants told residents Tuesday night that under their new calculations, emergency roads would have to be elevated even higher than the city previously called for, but residential roads could stay lower than originally planned.

The response from Miami Beach residents in attendance? A resounding, ‘no way.’

Anastasia Samoylova

Since 2016, Russian-American photographer Anastasia Samoylova has been capturing images of sea-level rise in South Florida in quiet — and often surprising — ways.

youth climate change
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

About 1,000 middle and high school students and teachers from 27 schools came together for the second annual Broward Youth Climate Summit in Fort Lauderdale. 

Students had the chance to participate in a Broward County version of 'Game of Floods,' an interactive scenario. They also heard panels on how sea level rise will impact politics, art, economics, law and how they can advocate for policy change. The day-long event took place at the Museum of Discovery and Science.

 

South Beach Jazz Festival

Happy New Year Sundialers, here’s a rundown of the Thursday, Jan. 2, episode of Sundial:

Tampa Bay Times’ Investigation Looks At The ‘Baker Act’

The Tampa Bay Times recently released an investigation about the ‘Baker Act,’ the Florida law that allows families to involuntarily institutionalize people considered impaired because of mental illness. The investigation revealed that the law is impacting children as young as 6 throughout Florida. 

AP

Just after he entered the White House, President Donald Trump pulled out of the Paris Climate accord. It was only the most obvious rebuke of efforts to address climate change, that has since included ending a NASA carbon monitoring program and loosening regulations on air pollution.

WLRN archives

Miami can claim yet another climate title: hottest year on record in a three-way tie with 2015 and 2017.

Steamy high temps for the year averaged 79.1 degrees, according to Brian McNoldy, a Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researcher who tracks climate-related conditions at the University of Miami’s Virginia Key campus.

"All three years are now tied for first place," McNoldy said. "We ended up about two degrees Fahrenheit above the average, which is a big offset."

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