climate change

Kate Stein / WLRN

Florida is hot and may be trending hotter: 2015, 2017 and the early part of 2018 all set temperature records.

A new report shows that people who work outdoors in all 67 Florida counties frequently work in dangerously hot conditions as climate change leads to hotter days and more of them.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

Visitors to a haunted house in Delray Beach last weekend were greeted by a mermaid living in a trash heap and pictures of a polluted ocean projected onto the wall.

The next room was even more bleak. The polar ice caps had melted, and everyone in coastal areas drowned.

Further into the house, a girl left bloody handprints as she banged on a window from the outside, and a boy lay on a gurney, spinning an electric drill and mumbling about applesauce. They were both driven mad by a new epidemic gripping the post-apocalyptic world.

Kate Stein / WLRN

A coalition of southeast Florida counties is leading the state in responding to vulnerabilities caused by climate change and sea-level rise, according to state environmental leaders.

On Thursday, officials and planners who represent Monroe, Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties met at the Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit to discuss progress on issues linked to climate change. Noah Valenstein, the secretary of Florida's Department of Environmental Protection, thanked the more than 300 people gathered.

Florida International University

Sea-level rise is beginning to impact everyday life for some neighborhoods in South Florida: roads flood, insurance prices rise, and cities and counties ask voters to help pay for adaptation projects. There may soon be impacts to the Internet.

But the water's rising only millimeters at a time. And the majority of people here don't experience serious flooding.

Alejandra Martinez / WLRN

Global warming can feel like an overwhelming problem -- it is, after all, GLOBAL -- but many of the solutions already exist.

That was the message from one of the keynote speakers of what's been dubbed "Climate Week" in South Florida.

WINDSOR JOHNSON / NPR

A new report from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) breaks down the impacts of climate change and global warming.

The report suggests the planet must take action to keep temperatures from rising 1.5 degrees Celsius or there will be grave consequences. Global warming’s affects to South Florida have increased flooding during King Tides and saltwater intrusion to its freshwater supplies. On Sundial we took a deeper look at those impacts and how South Floridians can help towards solutions.

Florida Center for Environmental Studies

How much do you know about sea-level rise?

How severe is the threat? And what are communities in South Florida doing to deal with higher waters?

On Monday night from 6-8 p.m., WLRN is hosting a town hall exploring the fundamentals of sea-level rise.

AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

Florida and Louisiana face a shared threat from sea-level rise -- a threat that's growing as higher seas increase flood risk and warmer temperatures strengthen hurricanes.

Mark Schleifstein is a Pulitzer-winning environment reporter with NOLA.com and the Times-Picayune in New Orleans. He attended high school in Miami. Schleifstein spoke with WLRN’s Kate Stein about the future of both places -- and about a community that’s already had to move away from the coast because of rising seas.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Everglades restoration needs to do more to account for climate change.

That’s the headline of a report released Wednesday by a Congressionally-appointed committee of scientists.

The report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine says agencies involved in restoration need to do more analysis of how sea-level rise and increasing rainfall impact Everglades projects.

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

Miami's mayor is joining a list of big names on a new international climate change commission.

Mayor Francis Suarez will be part of a new "Global Commission on Adaptation," led by Bill Gates, former United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and current World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva.

The commission includes 28 leaders from government, business and non-profits. They represent countries including the Marshall Islands -- one of the nations most at risk of having to relocate because of sea-level rise.

Pedro Portal pportal@miamiherald.com

Hurricane Michael approached Florida with ferocious speed this week, hitting the Panhandle as a Category 4 hurricane and leaving behind a trail of catastrophic damage. The storm went from a depression to a serious storm in less than a week.

According to the National Hurricane Center, Michael was the strongest hurricane to make landfall in the continental U.S. since Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

Floridians pay a price for living on the coast.

 

Hurricane Michael, which made landfall just shy of a Category 5 storm, ravaged the Panhandle and Big Bend area. The storm destroyed neighborhoods and washed out roads – changing lives forever.

Across New York City, more than 70 restaurants are tossing their oyster shells not into the trash or composting pile, but into the city's eroded harbor. It's all part of Billion Oyster Project's restaurant shell-collection program.

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