climate change

MIAMI HERALD

Florida’s first chief resilience officer, the person in charge of adapting the most vulnerable state in the nation to climate change, has an impressive resume. But it’s missing one thing — any obvious experience with climate change or resilience.

The candidate Gov. Ron Desantis is expected to name as soon as Wednesday, sources tell the Miami Herald, is Julia Nesheiwat. The governor’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Nesheiwat had no comment. No formal announcement has been made.

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra / WLRN

The City of Miami wants to hear from residents about their concerns over South Florida’s vulnerability to climate change.

The Office of Resilience and Sustainability launched a series of community discussions and workshops in Coconut Grove Monday night, called Climate Ready Miami. The meetings will go through September and then the city will then develop initiatives and strategies to respond to concerns.

Viktoriia Radchuk, an evolutionary ecologist at Berlin's Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, wanted to know how animals were responding to climate change.

So she scoured the results of more than 10,000 animal studies — on species from frogs to snakes, from insects to birds to mammals — looking for information on how changing environments were affecting animal behavior. Based on the available data, she decided to focus on birds in the Northern Hemisphere.

Jenny Staletovich/WLRN

In a gravel parking lot on Virginia Key crowded with shade tanks used for raising fish, coral researchers have a new project underway: a Noah's Ark for disappearing coral.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Rebuild Florida is a state program that helps people whose homes were severely damaged in Hurricane Irma. The program is also aimed at removing some homes in harm's way .

PEDRO PORTAL / MIAMI HERALD

Climate change is making the planet warmer, but a new report says there's something worse on the horizon: extreme heat.

By Jessica Meszaros

A new study describes the future mass redistribution of plants and animals on Earth due to climate change. 

 
The research conducted by the University of Florida and the University of Tasmania appears in the journal Nature Climate Change.
 
An author of the study says Florida is already experiencing this migration due to global warming.
 
Brett Scheffers, a professor of wildlife ecology at UF, spoke with WUSF's Jessica Meszaros.

People across southern Louisiana are spending the weekend worried about flooding. The water is coming from every direction: the Mississippi River is swollen with rain that fell weeks ago farther north, and a storm called Barry is pushing ocean water onshore while it drops more rain from above.

It's a situation driven by climate change, and one that Louisiana has never dealt with, at least in recorded history. And it's raising questions about whether New Orleans and other communities are prepared for such an onslaught.

AL DIAZ / MIAMI HERALD

A new high tide forecast from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration calls for ongoing sea rise to nearly double the number of days with sunny day flooding over just two decades ago.

The forecast, issued Wednesday for the entire U.S. coast, concludes that flooding from tides is likely to change from a sporadic problem to a chronic one.

Sea levels are rising, and that is sending more ocean water into streets, sewers and homes. For people who live and work in coastal communities, that means more otherwise-sunny days disrupted by flooding.

France plans to put an "ecotax" on nearly all airline flights starting in 2020, French Transport Minister Elisabeth Borne said Tuesday. The new tax could bring in some $200 million annually that would support modes of travel that pollute less — such as trains.

"With the eco-contribution, air transport will play its part in financing the daily transport of all our citizens," Borne said via Twitter. She added, "It is a response to the ecological urgency and sense of injustice expressed by the French."

Jamie Margolin / Courtesy

Students from across the country are in Miami this week for a three-day event, called "This Is Zero Hour: The Youth Climate Summit." It's being hosted by the international youth climate advocacy organization Zero Hour, a group of 25 students who are striving to protect the environment. 

David Goldman / AP

As of July 1, Florida is expanding several new toll roads. A new law extends the Florida Turnpike west to connect with the Suncoast Parkway; expands the Suncoast Parkway from the Tampa Bay area to the Georgia border; and adds a new multi-use corridor, including a toll road, from Polk County to Collier County.

This week on an encore edition of The Florida Roundup, we revisit that and other top stories from 2019.

PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD

Almost two years after he visited the Caribbean to see for himself the devastation left by hurricanes

Irma and Maria in Antigua and Barbuda and Dominica, United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres is back—this time to meet with leaders of the 15-member Caribbean Community, Caricom, in St. Lucia.

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