college

News Service of Florida and Steve Newborn

Part of a new elections law that requires “sufficient nonpermitted parking” at early voting sites will create an unconstitutional burden on young voters attending colleges or universities, plaintiffs in a long-running dispute over campus early voting argued in documents filed Monday.

The parking requirement was tucked into a sweeping elections package during the waning days of the legislative session in early May. Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis signed the package (SB 7066), and the new law went into effect on July 1.

Women are on track to make up a majority of the college-educated labor force this year, marking a historic turning point in gender parity.

As colleges and universities across the country report an explosion of mental health problems, a new book argues that college life may be more stressful than ever. Dr. Anthony Rostain, co-author of The Stressed Years of Their Lives, notes that today's college students are experiencing an "inordinate amount of anxiety" — much of it centered on "surviving college and doing well."

Robert Smith encouraged graduates to "pay it forward" in his commencement speech Sunday at Morehouse College.
TicToc by Bloomberg / YouTube

Billionaire investor and

The director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau says the Trump administration's Education Department is getting in the way of efforts to police the student loan industry. The revelation, in a letter obtained by NPR, comes at the same time that lawsuits allege that widespread wrongdoing by student loan companies is costing some borrowers thousands of dollars.

Kaylee Rodriguez / WLRN

College graduation is here. And you've probably been seeing a lot of photos of recent graduates from the class of 2019 with their caps, gowns and smiles. But what happens to South Florida graduates after they receive their diploma?

Some will continue their education into graduate school. Others are heading into the job market. Some will be staying in South Florida to build their lives and careers. And others will leave to try and find their dreams in another place. And many will be leaving with student loan debt.

Nearly 2,300 teachers have just had a mountain of student loan debt lifted off their backs, according to previously unreleased figures from the U.S. Department of Education. The move follows reporting by NPR that exposed a nightmare for public school teachers across the country.

Actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, entered not guilty pleas Monday in federal court in Boston.

Both waived their right to appear in court for arraignment.

Federal prosecutors announced additional charges last week against Loughlin, Giannulli and 14 other wealthy parents. They face one count of conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and honest-services mail and wire fraud, as well as one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Right now, students across the country are in the process of choosing where to go to college. For many, that decision is closely tied to a school's financial aid offer. But with no current standardization of these offers, letters look vastly different from one college to the next. They're often filled with confusing terms and jargon, and not all colleges define and calculate these terms the same way.

This time last year, McKenna Hensley had a big question on her mind: Where would she go to college? The answer — sort of — was somewhere in her pile of 10 financial aid offers. Each school she'd been admitted to had its own individualized letter, terms and calculations.

"It was very confusing," the now college freshman remembers.

Sixteen parents, including actress Lori Loughlin and her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, face new charges in the college admissions scandal that has already snared dozens of wealthy individuals. The Justice Department announced Tuesday that a second superseding indictment has charged them with money laundering and conspiring to commit fraud.

Updated at 5:07 p.m. ET

Thirteen parents and one coach charged in the college admissions scandal will plead guilty, federal prosecutors announced Monday. One of the parents is Felicity Huffman, the actress who is among the best known of the wealthy individuals arrested in the cheating case that broke last month.

Steven Senne / AP

After dozens were charged in a wide-ranging college admissions cheating and bribery scandal last week, the former President of the University of North Florida said Friday on The Florida Roundup that he wasn’t entirely surprised by some of the tactics used in the scam  but was “stunned” by the scope and that it went on as long as it did.

Test-Taker In College Scheme Suspended From Bradenton’s IMG Academy

Mar 15, 2019

A Bradenton prep school administrator has been suspended from his job after he was accused of taking college admissions tests for students as part of a scheme in which wealthy parents bribed coaches and others to get their children into elite universities.

Partner In Little Haiti Project Charged In College Admissions Scam Investigation

Mar 12, 2019
Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

Robert Zangrillo, one of the main investors in the controversial Magic City Innovation District project in Little Haiti, has been charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud by the Department of Justice.

Zangrillo, the CEO of the Miami-based investment firm Dragon Global, was one of 33 parents accused on Tuesday morning with paying a third party to help get their children accepted into elite universities around the U.S.

Pages