Cuba

http://farm1.staticflickr.com/224/448332346_f5d2c22b8b_z.jpg
Guillermo Esteves

2012 may be remembered in Latin American for what didn't happen more than for what actually did, especially in Venezuela and Cuba.

VENEZUELA

The year began ominously for Venezuelan nationals living in South Florida.  The U.S. State Department expelled the country's consul-general, alleging she was involved in a cyber-terrorism plot. In January, Venezuela's Miami consulate was shut down by President Hugo Chavez, who was facing a tough reelection campaign. 

Todd Webster / The Front Porch Cafe

Today is Nochebuena, Christmas Eve, and for many Hispanics, that means roasting a whole pig. This Christmas tradition scared journalist and author Carlos Frias as a boy. But he got through it with one piece of advice: “Never look a pig in the eye.”

Frias told a version of this story at a Lip Service event:

We've had to focus on news about the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., since Friday, which means we missed some interesting stories over the past few days. NPR intern Rachel Brody shares one of them.

This is a story about a daily commute that spanned regimes, not just miles.

Cuba To Ban Reggaeton In Public Places

Dec 14, 2012
S, Flickr

The Cuban government officially doesn't like reggaeton. As some of you know, reggaeton is that mix of Jamaican dancehall music and Spanish hip hop that you hear blasted through car speakers all over Miami and in almost any club you go to in the city.

I would say reggaeton is an acquired taste, but the Cuban government was some pretty serious feelings about this.

South Florida In The Cross-Hairs: Charles Carter

Oct 26, 2012
Charles D. Carter

October 1962 was life-changing for Miami native Charles Carter. Though he was only 16, he skipped school to go to an Army Recruiting Office the morning after President Kennedy's speech revealed Russian missiles in Cuba. Because he was underage, his parents had to give permission for him to enlist. Luckily, they did. And soon Carter found himself manning a missile site in the 'Glades -- one of four hastily erected around South Florida in the fall of '62 (pictured in above photos taken by Carter).

How The Cuban Missile Crisis Shaped Miami

Oct 24, 2012
Charles D. Carter

Where were you on October 22, 1962?

If you aren’t old enough to remember, ask someone over 50. That day, when President Kennedy revealed in a national TV broadcast that there were missiles in Cuba, was life altering for many, especially in South Florida.

Deb Acosta

There's one more presidential debate left, and it takes place in the most crucial swing state of them all.  Host Phil Latzman along with panel of journalists, politicians and an academic discuss U.S. foreign policy and domestic issues important to Florida voters.  

The lead story on the digital version of Cuba's communist newspaper Granma puts to rest the death rumors that have plagued Fidel Castro for weeks.

One week after the latest rumors of his death, former Cuban leader Fidel Castro has emerged — sort of — in a letter he's said to have written.

Cuba Softens Travel Restrictions With A Big Catch

Oct 16, 2012
Fotos Gov/Ba/ Flickr

Today the Cuban government announced that Cubans will no longer need an exit visa from the state in order to leave the country for travel, etc. However, the government simultaneously cracked down on travel for high skilled workers.

As of January 14, 2012, Cubans will only need a visa from the country they are traveling to in order to leave the country. 

Cuban Nostalgia For 3 Cents A Cup

Jun 15, 2011
Healingdream / Freedigitalphotos.net

For many Cubans living in South Florida, the pre-Castro years in Cuba represent a golden era. Nostalgia for friends, family and yesteryear traditions can be felt at Cuban coffee counters across South Florida. One local business owner decided to take this yearning for tradition one step further by selling coffee for 3 cents, the price it was sold for in pre-Castro Cuba.
 

Dale M. McDonald (Florida State Archives)

Listen as Alfredo Malagon tells WLRN-Miami Herald News reporter Rick Stone the story of a harrowing inspection by Cuban authorities at a detainment camp before his family left the island. 

The music in this piece is “Jazz Sepulchre” by Up, Bustle, and Out.

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