Cuba

Anti-Castro Militant Luis Posada Carriles Is Dead At 90

May 23, 2018
Roberto Koltun / Miami Herald

Luis Posada Carriles, the Cuban exile leader and CIA agent who targeted Fidel Castro's rule, died early Wednesday morning, his lawyer said.

Posada Carriles, 90, was "sick for some time," said lawyer Arturo Hernández. He had suffered from throat cancer and was injured in a car crash three years ago.

"I'm very sorry," the lawyer said. "At least he tried to do something for Cuba."

Posada Carriles was a controversial figure.

He was considered a hero by many Cuban exiles for his participation in the Bay of Pigs invasion and for attempts to overthrow Castro.

Desmond Boylan / AP via Miami Herald

Cuban officials are still identifying the 111 people who died in last Friday’s crash of a Cubana Airlines 737 on takeoff from Havana. Two surviving passengers remain in critical condition. Some Cubans here hope the tragedy will bring changes to how Cuba – and the U.S. – approach air travel on the island.

ALBERTO ROQUE AFP/Getty Images

Cuban state media reported that a Boeing 737 on a domestic flight crashed in a rural area Friday afternoon shortly after takeoff from Havana's José Martí International Airport.

There were reportedly 104 passengers plus crew aboard the plane that was leased by Cubana de Aviación, the Cuban national airline, from a Mexican company. At least three survivors were transported to a nearby hospital. Granma, the Communist Party newspaper, reported the three were in critical condition.

Fidel Castro is dead and brother Raúl is no longer president of Cuba. But communism can still move the needle in Miami campaigns.

Decades after the Cuban revolution spawned an exodus that reshaped South Florida culture and U.S. politics in the Caribbean, political exiles are declining in number in Miami and leftist angst is fading. But it's far from gone. And under the right conditions and in the right neighborhoods, evoking the tyranny of dictators can still be an effective tactic in manipulating votes and undercutting opponents.

WLRN

Sundial's guests for Wednesday, April 18:

Cuba's Raul Castro stepped down and the new leader of the communist island is Miguel Diaz-Canel. WLRN's Tim Padgett discusses what the new president means for U.S.-Cuba relations.

AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

Covering Cuba, I’ve long followed this maxim: If both the communist leadership in Havana and the exile leadership in Miami are angry at you, you’ve probably done your job right.

I felt that way 10 years ago this very week, when I wrote that Fidel Castro and his brother Raúl disagreed on economic policy.

Updated at 1:08 p.m. ET

Miguel Mario Díaz-Canel Bermúdez has been elected president of Cuba, officially ending the Castro family's decades of domination of the country's highest office. The Communist Party formally announced the presidency's transition from Raúl Castro on Thursday, in what might better be described as a coronation than an election.

Cuba's New President Is The First Non-Castro In 42 Years. How Much Power Will He Have?

Apr 19, 2018
Associated Press

Cuba's new President Miguel Mario Díaz-Canel grew up in the Cuban revolution and it's clear his mission is to make sure it survives.

Ismael Francisco / AP via Miami Herald

Updated April 19, 2018

Cuba’s likely new president is a good generation younger than the Castro crowd he’s replacing. The younger generation of Cuban exiles here doesn’t expect that to mean change on the communist island. But many say it’s better than what Cuba has now.

Miguel Díaz-Canel Is The Only Official Candidate For Cuba's Next President

Apr 18, 2018
Associated Press

Miguel Díaz-Canel, who wasn't even born at the time of the 1959 Cuban Revolution, is the only candidate proposed for president by Cuba's National Assembly, which voted Wednesday on a successor to the retiring Raúl Castro.

Cuba's parliament, however, won't officially reveal the results of the vote until it readjourns Thursday.

Ismael Francisco / AP via Miami Herald

On Wednesday, Cuba may have a new president, elected by the National Assembly. (The election session had been scheduled to start Thursday, but the government moved it up a day.)

“Election” is a relative term here – Cuba is a communist state – but something does set it apart.

Associated Press

Cuba moved up by a day the historic legislative session in which Raúl Castro will leave the presidency. The session of the National Assembly will be on Wednesday instead of Thursday, official press reported Monday.

The Council of State said it was moving up the meeting of the National Assembly in order to “facilitate the development of the steps that such a transcendental session requires.” The National Assembly session will begin at 9 a.m. in Havana’s Convention Palace.

Katie Lepri / WLRN News

Guests for Sundial Tuesday April 10, 2018:

Florida Gov. Rick Scott announced Monday that he will run for the Senate. He will be challenging  incumbent democratic Sen. Bill Nelson.  Politico Florida Senior Editor Sergio Bustos joined the program via Skype to discuss Scott's announcement .

Holocaust Survivor

U.S. Attorney Southern District of Florida

The Bay of Pigs is one of the darkest episodes of Cuban-American history. But that failed 1961 attempt by Cuban exiles to overthrow Fidel Castro had another dark result. Some of its resentful veterans came back to the U.S. to form a violent Cuban-American mafia called The Corporation.

Evan Vucci / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

When Cuban dictator Fidel Castro died two years ago, then U.S. President Barack Obama issued a lame response: “History will record and judge the enormous impact of this singular figure on the people and world around him.”

Mister Rogers would have offered a tougher assessment of Castro, a communist caudillo whose repressive revolution has ruled Cuba for 59 years. When Obama’s statement reached Havana, you could hear regime apparatchiks high-fiving each other all over the island.

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