DACA

As politicians in Washington try and figure out what to do with the DACA program — Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals — across the country, DACA recipients are working on their own plans ... trying to stay in the country if Congress doesn't act in time.

FIU Students March for 'Clean' Dream Act

Nov 9, 2017
Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Several dozen Florida International University students walked out of classes and marched around campus Thursday calling for federal immigration reform.

Students called on Congress to pass a “clean” Dream Act, without attaching it to anti-immigration policies like a border wall. They also protested the Trump administration’s decision to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).  That’s President Obama’s policy to suspend deportation for young people who came to the U.S. illegally as children.

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

State Rep. David Richardson of Miami Beach, who is running for Ileana Ros-Lehtinen's seat as U.S. representative for Florida's 27th Congressional District, held a Dreamer Dinner at David’s Cafe in Miami Beach to discuss immigration reform with Dreamers and their families.

“We need immigrants in this country. We depend on a growing base in our population. We depend on younger people to make our economy successful,” said Richardson said at the event on Sunday.

President Trump on Sunday sent Congress a list of sweeping immigration changes he says "must be included as part of any legislation addressing the status of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients."

Trump wants the border wall he campaigned on to be built, a crackdown on illegal immigration and to switch the U.S. legal immigration system from one that prioritizes family connections to one based on merit.

José A. Iglesias / El Nuevo Herald

U.S. Rep. Carlos Curbelo joins us for a conversation about Puerto Rico, DACA, and the Las Vegas mass shooting - and the need for "sensible gun policy."

Then we hear from Marine Col. Michael Samarov about recovery efforts in Dominica and the Leeward Islands.

Several states are suing the Trump administration to block it from terminating the program protecting young immigrants known as DREAMers.

The lawsuit, filed Wednesday in the Eastern District of New York, was brought by the attorneys general of 15 states and the District of Columbia. All are Democrats.

It follows the administration's announcement Tuesday that it would phase out the Obama-era program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said DACA would end in March 2018 unless Congress takes action to salvage it.

Erik Erazo says the end of the DACA program threatens all the things that the young people he works with have achieved.

"You see in their eyes the fear, that's the heartbreaker," says Erazo, a high school counselor in Olathe, Kan.

Updated at 11:58 a.m. ET

With President Trump's announcement on Tuesday that his administration is ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, the White House made clear it wants a legislative solution from Congress to protect the roughly 800,000 "DREAMers," who came to the U.S. illegally as children and now could face the possibility of deportation.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

On Tuesday President Trump officially canceled DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. That’s the program that protects undocumented immigrants from deportation if they were brought here as children. As news spread at a rally in Miami for DACA recipients,  the mood was defiant.

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

The Trump administration Tuesday formally announced it will end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — also called DACA — putting an expiration date on the legal protections granted to roughly 800,000 people known as "DREAMers," who entered the country illegally as children.

President Trump issued a statement, saying, "I do not favor punishing children, most of whom are now adults, for the actions of their parents. But we must also recognize that we are nation of opportunity because we are a nation of laws."

Allison Light, WLRN

President Donald Trump is likely to announce the end of a program that extends legal protections to people who were brought into the U.S. illegally as children, multiple news agencies report.

Associated Press

WASHINGTON - President Donald Trump is expected to announce that he will end protections for young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children, but with a six-month delay, people familiar with the plans said Sunday.

 

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

The White House will announce its decision about DACA, an Obama-era immigration policy, on Tuesday, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. President Trump had earlier said the announcement could come at some point over the weekend.

As a presidential candidate, Trump pledged to "immediately terminate" DACA, the program that former President Barack Obama began five years ago to protect immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

But once in the White House, Trump took a softer stance.

Roberto Koltun / Miami Herald

With the future of a program that protects undocumented young people from deportation in question, leaders of Miami-Dade lined up Wednesday to voice their support for “Dreamers” and reassure scared kids that the community has their back.

Demonstrators came from across the country to gather at the White House in support of undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as toddlers and children.

Five years ago today, President Obama signed an executive order protecting them from deportation. It's known as DACA — Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Now immigrant rights groups — and immigrants themselves — worry that opponents and President Trump's administration are quietly working to revoke protection for DACA participants — young people like Claudia Quiñonez from Bolivia:

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