DREAMERS

Updated at 9:10 p.m. ET

Jared Kushner has been quietly trying to resurrect discussions to overhaul the U.S. immigration system, multiple people familiar with the conversations have told NPR.

President Trump's senior adviser and son-in-law has been meeting with business leaders, immigration hard-liners and other interest groups important to Republicans with the goal of rolling out a new immigration plan once Trump's impeachment trial ended.

Nery Lopez / Courtesy

Nery Lopez, 23, was one of several thousand undocumented immigrants rallying and protesting in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on Tuesday last week. 

Lopez and a delegation of about 70 others from Florida drove 18 hours to witness oral arguments and hear stories from many like them on the fate of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA). This program was established in 2012 under the Obama administration and promised to temporarily protect from deportation individuals who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children. Lopez was just 4-years-old when her parents brought her to the U.S. from Veracruz, Mexico. 


The U.S. Supreme Court's conservative majority signaled Tuesday that it may let the Trump administration shut down the Obama-era program that granted temporary protection from deportation to roughly 700,000 young people, commonly known as DREAMers.

Brought to the U.S. illegally as children, the DREAMers were allowed to legally work and go to school if they met certain requirements and passed a background check. The program, begun in 2012, is known as DACA — Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Mitchell Santos Toledo came to the United States when he was 2. His parents had temporary visas when they brought him and his 5-year-old sister to the country. They never left. This spring, Santos Toledo will graduate from Harvard Law School. He is one of the 700,000 DREAMers whose fate in the U.S. may well be determined by a Supreme Court case to be argued Tuesday.

The future of DACA hangs in the balance as the Supreme Court prepares to hear arguments about the program next week.

House Republican leaders will start the coming week the same way they started last week: facing partywide insurrection over an immigration bill that has been repeatedly sabotaged by President Trump.

MARK FOLEY VIA FL HOUSE WEBSITE / FLORIDA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Guests for Sundial on Monday, March 5:

Democratic State Rep. Kionne McGhee, from District 117 in Miami-Dade County , discussed Senate Bill 7026, also known as the  Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Act.

Monday was supposed to be the day that DACA ended.

But court rulings have blocked President Trump from phasing out the program, at least for now, and negotiations have stalled out in Congress. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program protects undocumented immigrants brought to the country as children from deportation.

DACA recipients and their supporters want to keep the pressure on the White House and Congress to come up with a program to replace DACA.

Two-thirds of Americans say people brought to the United States as children and now residing in the country illegally should be granted legal status — and a majority are against building a wall along the border with Mexico, according to a new NPR/Ipsos poll.

Miami Herald

Sundial guests for Wednesday, January 31st, 2018

Jessica Bakeman/WLRN Education Reporter gives us an update on the legislative session.

Author/Journalist Laura Wides-Munoz discusses her book "The Making of a Dream."

Felicia Hatcher/ Co-founder of Black Tech Week joins us to talk tech in South Florida.

Caitie Switalski / WLRN

  South Florida Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz is one of a few lawmakers who are bringing Dreamers as their special guests to Tuesday’s State of the Union Address. 

 

In the U.S. there are 1.8 million Dreamers, otherwise known as recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) immigration status. It was last year that President Donald Trump made known he would not be renewing the program, which would affect an estimated 800,000 of these Dreamers. 

President Trump and congressional Democrats appear no closer to a deal on protecting "Dreamers" from deportation, but GOP lawmakers are working on a Plan B that would — if approved — prevent an election-year shutdown of the government, extending funding at least another month.

A continuing resolution is due to expire this Friday, but Republicans have proposed kicking the can down the road once more with an extension on stop-gap funding through Feb. 16.

As the prospect of a long-term immigration deal for young people who were brought to the country illegally as children dwindles, the Justice Department is appealing a court ruling that blocked the Trump administration from ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

The department says it will take "the rare step" later this week of filing a petition asking the Supreme Court to intervene.

Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

Hours after the U.S. government announced it would again begin processing renewal applications for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals due to a federal court order, President Trump claimed that the program — which has granted a temporary legal reprieve to people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children — was "probably dead."

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