DREAMERS

Updated 9:55 a.m. ET

A federal judge in California temporarily blocked the Trump administration's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program late Tuesday night.

Widely known as DACA, the program protects young immigrants from deportation. In September, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the program would be phased out.

Congress, once again, finds itself days away from a potential government shutdown, and a fight over immigration could stand in the way of a deal to prevent it.

"It could happen," Trump told reporters Wednesday. "Democrats are really looking at something that is very dangerous for our country. They are looking at shutting down. They want to have illegal immigrants in many cases, people that we don't want in our country, they want to have illegal immigrants pouring into our country."

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

With the year ending, immigration advocates are raising pressure on Congress to pass legislation to protect DREAMers from deportation. At a major University of Miami forum on Tuesday, one top Miami Republican raised the stakes.

GOP U.S. Rep. Carlos Curbelo of Miami has a bill in Congress called the RAC Act, or Recognizing America’s Children. It would legalize the status of so-called DREAMers - some 800,000 undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as minors.

Zach Gibson / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

In 2012, conservative Florida Senator Marco Rubio made one of the strongest pitches for the DREAM Act I’ve ever heard.

The Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act, which has been sitting on Capitol Hill in one form or another since the turn of the century, would grant legal status to immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children. Rubio, a Cuban-American, said helping those so-called Dreamer immigrants was a “humanitarian mission.”

FIU Students March for 'Clean' Dream Act

Nov 9, 2017
Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Several dozen Florida International University students walked out of classes and marched around campus Thursday calling for federal immigration reform.

Students called on Congress to pass a “clean” Dream Act, without attaching it to anti-immigration policies like a border wall. They also protested the Trump administration’s decision to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).  That’s President Obama’s policy to suspend deportation for young people who came to the U.S. illegally as children.

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

State Rep. David Richardson of Miami Beach, who is running for Ileana Ros-Lehtinen's seat as U.S. representative for Florida's 27th Congressional District, held a Dreamer Dinner at David’s Cafe in Miami Beach to discuss immigration reform with Dreamers and their families.

“We need immigrants in this country. We depend on a growing base in our population. We depend on younger people to make our economy successful,” said Richardson said at the event on Sunday.

President Trump on Sunday sent Congress a list of sweeping immigration changes he says "must be included as part of any legislation addressing the status of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients."

Trump wants the border wall he campaigned on to be built, a crackdown on illegal immigration and to switch the U.S. legal immigration system from one that prioritizes family connections to one based on merit.

Several states are suing the Trump administration to block it from terminating the program protecting young immigrants known as DREAMers.

The lawsuit, filed Wednesday in the Eastern District of New York, was brought by the attorneys general of 15 states and the District of Columbia. All are Democrats.

It follows the administration's announcement Tuesday that it would phase out the Obama-era program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said DACA would end in March 2018 unless Congress takes action to salvage it.

Erik Erazo says the end of the DACA program threatens all the things that the young people he works with have achieved.

"You see in their eyes the fear, that's the heartbreaker," says Erazo, a high school counselor in Olathe, Kan.

Updated at 11:58 a.m. ET

With President Trump's announcement on Tuesday that his administration is ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, the White House made clear it wants a legislative solution from Congress to protect the roughly 800,000 "DREAMers," who came to the U.S. illegally as children and now could face the possibility of deportation.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

On Tuesday President Trump officially canceled DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. That’s the program that protects undocumented immigrants from deportation if they were brought here as children. As news spread at a rally in Miami for DACA recipients,  the mood was defiant.

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

The Trump administration Tuesday formally announced it will end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — also called DACA — putting an expiration date on the legal protections granted to roughly 800,000 people known as "DREAMers," who entered the country illegally as children.

President Trump issued a statement, saying, "I do not favor punishing children, most of whom are now adults, for the actions of their parents. But we must also recognize that we are nation of opportunity because we are a nation of laws."

Associated Press

WASHINGTON - President Donald Trump is expected to announce that he will end protections for young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children, but with a six-month delay, people familiar with the plans said Sunday.

 

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is narrowing the scope of an executive order on so-called sanctuary cities.

A federal judge in California last month blocked a key part of that order, reasoning that the Trump administration had overstepped by threatening to yank federal money from those places.

Bill Would Deny Tuition For Undocumented Immigrant Students

Dec 1, 2016

A newly elected state senator has filed legislation that would undo a 2014 law allowing in-state tuition for some undocumented immigrant students, potentially reopening an emotionally charged debate in the wake of Donald Trump's presidential win.

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