economy

A story in the Financial Times caught our eye this week. It was on foreign workers in South Korea.

The story looked at the town of Ansan, where about 7.6 percent of the population is foreign. They come from other Asian countries, as well as from Russia. Here's one of the reasons for the change in South Korea, a highly homogeneous society:

It all started out so promisingly. She was young, still in her teens, and she'd landed her first job. As is the custom in Brazil, to get your salary you have to open an account with the bank the company deals with — and with that new account came the woman's first credit card.

"The banks say, 'I want to help you,' " she says. "And if you have a credit card, it's a status symbol, you are well-regarded."

She switched jobs. That company dealt with another bank — which issued her another credit card. She got a store credit card, too.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Shawn Walton

After a period of economic decline, Miami's Overtown is getting a booster shot.

On Thursday, the city's Southeast Overtown / Park West Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) approved a joint plan that would cede two city blocks to a team of developers in the hopes of rejuvenating a stretch of land in one of Miami's core neighborhoods.

Talent retention is a hot topic.

It seems like every group and organization in South Florida is working on a formula to reverse the ‘brain drain’, stop the ‘intellectual exodus’ or prevent the ‘mind migration’. With solutions that range from online resources and job boards to skills-based training and data collection on Miami’s talent pool, there is no deficiency of great ideas.

Alan Diaz / AP

Starting Friday, Miami will see a sharp drop in sabotage, sniper fire and explosions. And that has quite a few people worried about the future.

With Thursday’s telecast of the finale of Burn Notice, the city’s No. 1 source of fictional attacks and espionage will end its seven-year run as the most successful series since Miami Vice and the linchpin of the English-language production industry.

Jay Pellis

Jay Pellis is among the thousands of South Floridians who are underemployed. After 18 months of being counted among the unemployed, that's improvement. This week, Pellis began a part-time job teaching GED classes to teenagers and young adults leaving the foster care system. It is the type of work he's done before.

It's been five years since Lehman Brothers collapsed and touched off a banking crisis that is still being felt by the global economy. Today, the banking industry is a lot stronger than it was, but some critics say efforts to reform banking regulations have fallen short of their potential.

Tom Hudson

Odds are Ian Kramer should be working. He has a MBA from USC. He has experience in the cut throat  world of Miami real estate development. The unemployment rate for someone with his education is half that of the overall level. And real estate is rebounding with several residential high rises sprouting from once dormant stretches of land.

freedigitalphotos.net

Half of the paychecks of Floridians are smaller today than they were in 2004. Thanks to a wicked combination of fewer working hours and the financial erosion of inflation, the median hourly wage in Florida is $0.63 less than what it was eight years ago, according to a recent study by the Research Institute on Social and Economic Policy at Florida International University.

Tom Hudson

Ian, Jay and Sal. That's them in the photo on the right. Each of them is an unemployment statistic with a story.

Florida Governor's Office

Gov. Rick Scott is pulling out all the stops to lure companies to Florida.

He convinced lawmakers to cut the sales tax on manufacturing equipment and do away with regulations that could hinder economic growth.

RELATED: The Sunshine Economy: Jobs

Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Patrick Kline, Emmanuel Saez / http://www.equality-of-opportunity.org/

Children from low income families in Florida have the best chance of achieving a higher income level if they grow up in Miami.

Surprised?

I was.  Based on my layman's understanding, I thought we would have low rates of income mobility.

High food prices, a currency in free fall, battered investors and slowing growth: India is facing a host of problems that have taken away the sheen from an economy that's had a decade of mostly stron

http://srnels.people.wm.edu/

07/30/13 - Tuesday's Topical Currents looks at the history of US financial crunches.  It’s easy to recall the recession of 2008 or the 1929 stock market crash, but there have been many more panics, and they’ve all revolved around consumer, state and federal defaults. We’ll speak with Scott Reynolds, author of A NATION OF DEADBEATS:  An Uncommon History of America’s Financial Disasters. The first U-S financial crisis was in 1792. Tha

FlickR.com/Images_of_Money

Two South Florida politicians said a week spent just "getting by" -- has gotten to them.  

Broward County Commissioner Martin Kiar and State Senator Dwight Bullard agreed last week to spend five days trying to live on Florida's current minimum wage of $7.79 an hour.

Kiar says the week-long budget he drew up for himself left only $106 dollars for food, travel and entertainment for him and his family.

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