florida hurricanes

MIDDAY MONDAY UPDATE:  Michael has become the season's seventh hurricane, an

Samantha J. Gross / Miami Herald

Gov. Rick Scott on Sunday declared a state of emergency in Northwest Florida as a looming hurricane threatens to hammer the region in the middle of the week.

Scott said during a 6 p.m. news conference that he declared an emergency in 26 counties in the Panhandle and the Big Bend --- generally areas surrounding Tallahassee --- because of a storm in the Gulf of Mexico that became Tropical Storm Michael on Sunday.

Update Sunday 1 pm: The National Hurricane Center issued an intermediary update Sunday afternoon to advise that “satellite wind data indicated the depression has strengthened” into a tropical storm and has now acquired the name Michael. The story below has been revised to include this new information.

AL DIAZ / Miami Herald

More than a year after Hurricane Irma, blue tarps still lay on roofs across South Florida. According to the Miami Herald, tens of thousands of homeowners across the state are still waiting for assistance to pay for damages to their houses and many have sued insurance companies.

Three Systems to Watch in the Atlantic

Sep 7, 2018

Gordon may be gone, but there's no doubt the heart of hurricane season is here. Florence is a potential hurricane threat to the Mid-Atlantic states next week, and two other tropical waves are likely to develop behind it this weekend. One, in particular, could - emphasis on the word “could” - be a concern to Florida in about ten days.

It's been almost a year since Hurricane Irma impacted Central Florida in mid-September - but the damage it did is still being calculated.

U.S. forecasters say the Atlantic hurricane season may be less active than they previously predicted.

AL DIAZ / Miami Herald

Florida’s Public Service Commission (FPSC) has new recommendations to improve electrical systems after a hurricane. 

In their new report, “Review of Florida’s Electric Utility Hurricane Preparedness and Restoration Actions 2018,” the FPSC used data collected from past hurricane reviews and identified tree trimming, underground power lines and utility workers as critical areas to hurricane preparedness.

Miami Herald Archive

The chances of a major hurricane happening this year have dropped dramatically, federal forecasters said on Thursday.
 

That upbeat revised prediction comes just as the Atlantic hurricane season typically heats up, with August, September and October historically producing the most and strongest storms.

The reasons for the dwindling possibilities: Cooler surface temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean, non-conducive wind patterns and warmer Pacific Ocean waters are creating a hostile environment for hurricanes in the Atlantic and Caribbean basins.

Riane Roldan / WLRN

There's a buzzword among people who work on quality-of-life issues in South Florida: "Resilience."

It’s a concept we often apply to a person, someone who's able to cope with difficult circumstances. But more and more, the word is being used in the context of how communities respond to issues like traffic, hurricanes, affordable housing and rising seas.

Lawmakers Poised To Approve Citrus Farmer Money

Jul 19, 2018

Gov. Rick Scott on Wednesday urged the Joint Legislative Budget Commission to approve $340 million in federal block grant funding to help the state’s hurricane-ravaged citrus industry. 

Kate Stein / WLRN

After Hurricane Irma, some people with low-wage jobs took weeks to recover the costs of supplies and days of missed work. In parts of the Florida Keys, people spent months rebuilding homes and businesses.

FPL Customers To Receive Hurricane Matthew Recovery Refund

Jul 11, 2018

Florida Power & Light customers will see a small, one-time credit in August that in part corrects an “over-recovery” cost for Hurricane Matthew, which whipped the east coast in 2016.

This report, part of an FCIR series on climate change, was produced in partnership with WMFE, the NPR member station in Orlando. The Florida Center for Investigative Reporting is a nonprofit news organization supported by foundations and individual contributions. For more information, visit fcir.org.

YANKEETOWN, Florida – While Florida state government bans the terms “climate change” and “global warming” in official business, this coastal fishing village of about 500 people and more water than dry land is being swallowed by the sea with almost no public attention or concern.

But town officials here are fighting back with some success.

Kate Stein / WLRN

The newspaper headline for August 28, 2019, reads: “Category 5 Hurricane Expected to Hit Homestead, South Miami in Three Days.”

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